Saltwater egg experiment: a fun science lesson in density

Saltwater egg experiment: a fun science lesson in density

Ever since Lilia learned about the Dead Sea in school, she has been enthralled. Anytime somebody mentions saltwater her ears perk up. “Oh, you mean like the Dead Sea? I’m going to go there someday and I’m going to sit and read a book while I’m floating!”

Playing off of this fascination, we took on the saltwater egg experiment today. It turned out to be pretty interesting. Lilia upped the ante a bit and added food coloring which made for some really cool results.

DSC_0002DSC_0011

Materials:

2 uncooked eggs (in their shells)

water

2 water glasses

6 tablespoons salt

food coloring (optional)

Procedure:

1. Fill each glass halfway with tap water.

2. Stir 6 tablespoons of salt into one of the glasses until dissolved.

3. Place one egg in the fresh water and one egg in the saltwater.

4. Observe which egg sinks to the bottom and which egg floats.

5. Optional – add several drops of food coloring to each container. Observe the differences in each glass.

DSC_0019DSC_0020

What happened?

This is a great lesson in density! Density refers to the amount of matter contained in a given space or volume. The saltwater has a higher density than the fresh water allowing the egg to float. This is true for the food coloring as well. Unless you stir it, the food coloring will float at the top of the saltwater.

DSC_0038

Something else we learned by chance is that salt intensifies the food coloring effect on the eggs. We stirred the food coloring into both glasses and left the eggs in for 1-2 minutes. When we took them out, the saltwater eggs were much more vibrantly colored. We’ll have to remember that technique for Easter next year.

Happy experimenting!

If you enjoyed this post and would like to follow our family’s daily adventures, please “like” us on Facebook and follow me on Twitter.

To subscribe to The New Abides, type your email address in the box and click the “create subscription” button. My list is completely spam free, and you can opt out at any time.

You might also enjoy:

Soap souffle: A microwave science experiment

DIY Lava Lamps: Our answer to a rainy day

Filed under: kids, science

Tags: density

Leave a comment