Tag: Rudyard Kipling

Kipling Tuesday: 'To James Whitcomb Riley,' a grateful reply to a fellow poet

Kipling Tuesday: 'To James Whitcomb Riley,' a grateful reply to a fellow poet
In 1890, Rudyard Kipling received a copy of “Rhymes for Children” by James Whitcomb Riley, a fellow poet, who lived in Indiana. These days, such a gift would result in some sort of social media post on the theme of “Look what I got!” But in 1890, Kipling wrote to Riley in a poem we... Read more »

Kipling Tuesday: Pondering 'The White Man's Burden' -- and understanding the past

Kipling Tuesday: Pondering 'The White Man's Burden' -- and understanding the past
For those who have wondered, and for those readers who have asked in the comments, here it is: It’s time to consider Rudyard Kipling’s poem “The White Man’s Burden.” Perhaps tellingly for the poem’s reputation and Kipling’s, I can’t find it on the Poetry Foundation’s otherwise exhaustive web site. My quotations are from “Rudyard Kipling... Read more »

Kipling Tuesday: What 'Gunga Din' is really saying

Kipling Tuesday: What 'Gunga Din' is really saying
To many, Rudyard Kipling’s poem “Gunga Din” is a relic at best, an offense at worst. I don’t agree, and I ask your indulgence as I take a few moments to look at what it really says and the noble view behind it. Yes, noble. (As a digression, enjoy one of the reasons the poem... Read more »
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Kipling Tuesday: 'The Last of the Light Brigade' and continuing to remember veterans

Kipling Tuesday: 'The Last of the Light Brigade' and continuing to remember veterans
If you saw the headline and reacted that Rudyard Kipling didn’t write “The Charge of the Light Brigade,” you’re correct. That was Alfred, Lord Tennyson, writing about the “noble six hundred” British forces who fought in the Battle of Balaclava in the Crimean War in 1854. But if you’re tempted to think of Veterans Day... Read more »

Kipling Tuesday: 'If,' minus the satires

Kipling Tuesday: 'If,' minus the satires
“If you can keep your head when all about you     Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,” begins Rudyard Kipling’s famous poem, “If.” But quickly — what’s the next line? If your reply is “Then you don’t understand what it’s like to work here,” I understand, but I  also have a marvelous poem to introduce... Read more »

Introducing Kipling Tuesdays: 'Recessional' and 'lest we forget'

Introducing Kipling Tuesdays: 'Recessional' and 'lest we forget'
Author’s note: The following post begins a new series on the poetry of Rudyard Kipling, who most U.S. readers will know only for “The Jungle Book.” After a few months of enjoying my father’s copy of Kipling’s complete verse in a “definitive edition,” I’m ready to share a weekly note of what I’ve learned. Rudyard... Read more »
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