Notebooks vs. computers

Notebooks vs. computers
Source: Reusableart.com

I was determined to get started at my desk this morning. My computer wasn’t. It was offline, as many from two providers in different states were — according to the radio news I heard, when the radio station itself wasn’t cutting off the air every few minutes or running groups of commercials to make up for that.

There were still things I could do. I read my assignment for my Thursday night Bible study class in my grandfather’s Bible. I looked at my notebook for things I got finished over the weekend and thought about what I need to do before a meeting this afternoon.

I even had some extra time during the down time with one of the books I’m reading.

This is part of why I get nervous about people talking about having their personal libraries on a Kindle or Nook device and all of their notes for various projects on notebook computers.

Sure, my novel-writing notebooks could break — if I get mad at them enough to through them down. My notebook of passwords is about to run out of space, but I can keep it anyway among the notebooks to the right of my PC. (I’m left-handed enough to know that the right side is safe storage.)

And my diaries — notebooks, to many bookshops where I bought them — are all still here. Were there “notebook computers” in 1975? I doubt it, but I could look for them in my ’75 diary without having to have any more of a format change than being able to read my handwriting from back then.

When I first heard about blogging, I heard it was people keeping diaries on their computers. That scared me away for a long time. What about when you need a new computer? What if it breaks, or locks you out as it did to me earlier today? I would never sleep properly!

My diaries are still the pen-on-paper method I’ve always used, although I now use ball-point pens instead of the markers I favored in early years. Space is getting full, but I have a few more years of room in the cabinet.

So the only relationship this morning’s down time is going to have with my diary is when I write about it tonight.

Filed under: Words Worth Defending

Comments

Leave a comment
  • This is something to think about, as more and more services are online---what happens when the internet goes down? Would phones still work? How much depends on these devices!

  • In reply to Weather Girl:

    I could wait for my own things, but when the radio station started having silent gaps, I got to wondering. My phone was still OK, somehow, but it is only mildly clever -- maybe not smart enough to catch what wasn't available.

  • In reply to Weather Girl:

    I have only Comcast, and Xfinity Voice didn't work. Presumably cell phones would work, but as the reference to radio indicates, that depends on whether Comcast connects the cell tower to the phone system.

    The outage affected TV, Voice, and Internet. I wonder if they had a backup to Home Security.

  • In reply to jack:

    I have Xfinity Internet -- but I make the check out to Comcast. My little phone is a Tracfone that I load cards onto to pay the bill first. I guess that's how it kept going.

  • In reply to Margaret H. Laing:

    Tracfone isn't such a great deal. Since you have Xfinity internet, you can get a deal on Xfinity Mobile, which for $15/month gets unlimited calls and text and 5 gb of data it's actually Verizon, so I doubt that it was subject to this outage.

    The problem with Tracfone was that if one didn't periodically load a new card, Tracfone cut service, even though the person was only using it for emergencies (thus making the phone useless) and had a positive balance on the account. BTW, most of the prepaid and so-called bargain phones are on the AT&T network.

  • In reply to jack:

    It's all right for me. Not having everything coming from the same company actually made me safer during the outage. It didn't sound like I could use a Comcast phone.

  • In reply to Margaret H. Laing:

    Comcast is the name of the company. Xfinity is the brand of its high speed services and NBC is the brand of its program services (also encompasses Universal and Peacock). Maybe inconsistently, it advertises Comcast Business instead of Xfinity Business.

    Between Disney and Comcast, there is too much brand engineering.

  • In reply to jack:

    Yes. I get reminded of that every time I have to write a check. I was just explaining a little for those who don't deal with it.

  • Several thoughts:
    1. I saw someone with an open laptop computer, using it as a "desk," on which she was drawing in a spiral notebook.
    2. Your computer wasn't broken--your Internet connection was. If something was on your Kindle, you could still read it.
    3. Your reference to paper reminds me of when I was working on forms software, there were debates over the platform on which the information was to be delivered, and whether we should be in the platform software business. However, information is intangible, and, effectively, the printing press was the delivery platform. The browser has pretty much done away with the software platform question, but one usually (but not always) need an Internet connection to use it.

  • In reply to jack:

    Good thoughts, thank you. I actually don't have a Kindle, at least yet; I have to be able to resist books somehow! Considering that I manage to mislay my phone, my reading glasses, and even my sewing box (thread, safety pins and other supplies), even in this studio apartment, I don't think a Kindle is right for me. I'm going without glasses right now, leaning a bit toward the screen -- it's definitely getting to be eye-doc time. I'll put the distance ones on later and/or just find the reading ones in the morning.

  • In reply to Margaret H. Laing:

    My point wasn't device specific, but also would have applied if you had purchased and downloaded an ebook from some online store--it would still be on your PC.

  • In reply to jack:

    Yes--it is the internet access I was thinking of. How much people depend on it. According to PEW Research from a few years ago, most people worldwide access the internet with their phones.

  • In reply to Weather Girl:

    Undoubtedly the case, but with COVID remote learning, laptops must be up there.

  • In reply to jack:

    Yes, laptops for sure, now.

  • In reply to Weather Girl:

    I've had people ask how I can use the Web and/or text much on my little phone. That's it, I can't, I reply -- my hands get tired enough with what I do.

  • In reply to Margaret H. Laing:

    That's why there are specialized apps. One thing I quickly learned is that I couldn't do business on a phone.

  • In reply to jack:

    Call me old-school as well as Serious, but about the only thing my phone does apart from sending messages (granted, some written) is backing up my alarm clock.

Leave a comment