Tag: Epigraph

Forgotten Chicagoans: Henry Worthmann

Forgotten Chicagoans: Henry Worthmann
Above the doorway on the building at 1859 W. Chicago Avenue in West Town reads “H. WORTHMANN BUILDING.” Henry W. Worthmann was born around June 18, 1857 in Hanover, Germany. He arrived in the United States in 1882 and he became a naturalized citizen in 1888. That same year, he married his wife, Agnes. He soon... Read more »

Forgotten Chicagoans: C. Julius Zuehlke

Forgotten Chicagoans: C. Julius Zuehlke
The epigraph “C.J. ZUEHLKE” appears above the window on the top floor of 1439 N. Milwaukee Avenue in Wicker Park. The building, designed in the Queen Anne style, was originally home to Christoph Julius Zuehlke, a tailor born in the early 1840s in Germany. He arrived in Chicago in 1869. He originally lived at 168 Cornell... Read more »

Forgotten Chicagoans: August Hanschmann

Forgotten Chicagoans: August Hanschmann
August Hanschmann was born on January 28, 1840 in Germany. His naturalization records don’t indicate when he arrived in the United States, but he became a naturalized citizen in 1887. He built this building at 1928 W. Division Street to house his saloon around this time. Interestingly, his last name was misspelled in its epigraph. August... Read more »
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Forgotten Chicagoans: Arne Waaler

Forgotten Chicagoans: Arne Waaler
The building at 687 N. Milwaukee Avenue in River West reads “A. WAA ER” near the top. Sometime in the last 100 years, this epigraph lost its “L”. Arne Waaler was born April 9, 1840 in Norway. He arrived in the United States in 1870 and became a Naturalized citizen in Chicago on August 1, 1874.... Read more »

Forgotten Merchants: General Furniture Company

Forgotten Merchants: General Furniture Company
The building at 1709 W. Chicago Avenue in West Town now houses a boxing training facility, but its elegant terra cotta facade gives an indication of what was once here. The General Furniture Company began in the early 1900’s. Billing itself as “Chicago’s Greatest Chain of Furniture Stores,” they had multiple other locations around Chicago,... Read more »

Forgotten Chicagoans: John Hufmeyer

Forgotten Chicagoans: John Hufmeyer
The John Hufmeyer building at 2770 N. Lincoln Avenue in Lakeview has a date of 1888 in set in stone on it, but he was doing business at that location for more than a decade prior. Hufmeyer was born in 1845 in the area that became Niles township. His German parents were some of the... Read more »
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Forgotten Merchants: M. Schulz Co.

Forgotten Merchants: M. Schulz Co.
The rather drab gray building at 711 N. Milwaukee Avenue reads “M. SCHULZ CO.,” as does the front door stoop in decorative tile.  Given its uninteresting appearance, one would figure this was probably just a small local retail business at one time. In fact, M. Schulz Co. was a very successful major American piano manufacturer... Read more »

Forgotten Merchants: Devoe and Raynolds Company

Forgotten Merchants: Devoe and Raynolds Company
On the corner of Halsted and Chicago (770 N. Halsted Street) stands a condominium building that once was the manufacturing plant for the Devoe & Raynolds paint company. The company has a long history. The company can traces its origins to 1754, when William Post began selling paint on the East River in New York.... Read more »

Forgotten Merchants: Weil Brothers

Forgotten Merchants: Weil Brothers
The building at 647 W. Lake Street in the Loop, built in 1899, is currently an office building, but it was once the home of plumbing supply manufacturer the Weil Brothers. The company was founded as a hardware supplier in 1881 by Isador and Benjamin Weil. They were originally located at what used to be... Read more »
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Forgotten Chicagoans: Bernhard Schuenemann

Forgotten Chicagoans: Bernhard Schuenemann
Atop the building at 1400 W. Chestnut Street in Noble Square reads B. SCHUENEMAN. Bernhard Schuenemann (misspelled on the building with one N) was born September 17, 1826 in what was once known as the province of Westphalia in Prussia. By the mid-1850s, he had moved to the US with his wife Maria Katharina. Between... Read more »
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