FAILURE IN THIS CASE WAS SUBLIME SUCCESS.

I have had a trusty friend by my side for the last eight years. That friend helped me get through the agony of losing a son who should have buried me – not the other way around. A son who absolutely adored my kimo-sabe, my tried-and-true buddy, named Sydney.

There we go showcasing the electrifying eyes of a DOG who is the anagram for something much greater. That’s Syd, Sydney, Syd-Syd-Syd. She has on her head the hand of an older adult who is in the care of the wonderful staff at the Community Adult Day Center (CADC). You see, Sydney, is not only the mascot of CADC, but in the moment of that picture, serving a bit of therapy known as the human/animal bond for a lady that is thrilled to see Syd. It makes her feel like she’s at home. The soft hair on the top of Syd’s head is bringing peace to that lady in white, so you know she’s a good soul.

For Syd, it was pure heaven.

From no more than a mere sixteen inches to her current weight of about 85 pounds, Sydney was the only canine in the house. Until I volunteered to serve as a foster parent to Sage, who had golden eyes that looked deep into your soul. I promised I would just be a foster and get Sage through the rigors of being de-wormed, being spayed, and overcoming the anxiety of being in a puppy mill grinding out litter after litter – all while being underfed. You could feel the ribs caged under the hide of Sage the Underfed who the West Suburban Humane Society rescued and entrusted to me to be a foster parent for four months during the treatment to eliminate heartworm, get the overworked baby machine spayed, and alleviate that fear of a lack of food.

Syd was not welcoming to the new character, even if she was a foster who had a crummy life before coming to live with us. It’s okay, dogs aren’t perfect even if they are perfection compared to human beings.

My daughter had volunteered to be a foster parent and even seemed to revel in providing that care and maintaining the temporary goals set including the end date. The end date was my problem. I got attached to the goofiness and the sweet nature of this SAGE, wise dog but nowhere near as smart as Sydney who had a 160 IQ in the dog world and was frankly amiss at why she had to put up with a dog who had possibly half of that intelligence, which in some ways made her endearing to dad/foster-dad.

When I arrived home from being out, it was Sage who was there to greet me with a thumping tail that knocked into those cabinets creating an echo of sound that reminded me of the fluency and beat that only a Gene Krupa or a Ginger Baker could achieve with two sticks thumping those pig skins. Syd wouldn’t move a muscle from her slumber on the couch. Syd knew she wasn’t going anywhere and I think she rubbed it in a bit with Sage who as I’ve already noted had anxiety issues. And then they found something they both liked…going to the Community Adult Day Center and now working as a tag team bringing serenity and peace just by letting their fans pet them. Ah, Pet therapy is best. when it’s served warm and two dogs generate more heat than one. Syd, being the smart one sensed that while as you can see, Sage, smiling – enjoying the bliss without a desire to see it for anything but what felt natural, being loved.

Maybe that’s why I failed as a foster parent. I saw the joy of a not-so-smart dog that may have been smarter than all of us, including Sydney. Sage just wanted one thing, a home filled with love. A SIMPLE WANT. That was enough reason for me to fail. I finally had to admit that I could GO DO a bit of GOOD by making that wish, maybe that dream come true.

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