Fenger Fights Back

Fenger Fights Back

Good news seems out of place this year, when so many things have gone so badly, but it’s helpful to remember that in and among the carnage and conflict there are some individual and collective accomplishments worth admiring.

Among them may be the story of the efforts of everyone at Fenger — students, parents, teachers, and administrators — who experienced the trauma of the Derrion Albert beating and kept moving ahead.

The story is told in the Tribune (How four Fenger High School students overcame obstacles to reach graduation), where it’s noted that 130 kids graduated earlier this year, thanks in part to a $1.6 million federal grant that allowed for a big increase in counselors. (“I essentially bought them a parent,” said Fenger principal Kimberly Dozier.)

Of course, there are lots of other Fengers out there in CPS, and of course there’s lots still wrong there and everywhere else.

 

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  • For sale Parents.........how sad.

  • The diminished budget is forcing principals to reduce the counseling staff at schools. Heard that network chiefs are encouraging this.

  • While I was reading this story this morning across my TV came a story that those Fenger grads that did get accepted in a college will face a 100 percent increase in student loan rates. These kids have zero assets and even if they get BAs they will likely be paying off these loans until they are in their very late 30s .

    Since the majority of very low income students who do go to college never graduate with a BA in 5 years and under federal law college student loan debt can't be wiped out by personal bankruptcy it's really very scary.

    Rod Estvan

  • In reply to Rodestvan:

    A great many realistic opportunities for merit scholarships are squandered by low academic growth in adolescents. Many above average low income students enter SE high school with an explore in the high teens and leave with an ACT in the low 20s. That's just not good enough.
    More skin pigment and less money has a real upside in selective college enrollment. But the college has to believe there's a good chance of success before they're going to offer significant money. No one working at a good university believes that low 20s ACT is fully college ready.
    But even low income students with higher test scores have a disappointing graduation rate.
    This whole cluster of issues in preparing and educating adolescents deserves more attention, rather than what Penny Pritzker had for breakfast.

  • In reply to Rodestvan:

    They will also not be able to obtain the Parent Plus loans that many colleges are now stating are part of their "no gap" financial aid package in their award letters, a new trend in the packages.

  • Donn we often disagree, but I have no disagreement at all with what you just wrote.

    Rod Estvan

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