A change of seasons

A change of seasons

December 1 marks the start of meteorological winter. December 21 is the winter solstice. From now until the winter solstice, there is less daylight every day. The sunsets are glorious, pink and gold. The earliest sunsets of the year are happening right now.

Now, the roses are gone; the thorns and rose hips remain. Milkweed pods are shattered, the silk and seeds waiting for the wind.

Most of the leaves on the trees have fallen, and the bare branches with a few remaining leaves have an austere and striking beauty.

Meteorologists say there will be a LaNina winter, this year. This may mean more snow than average, here, and the warmer waters of the Lake will also have an effect on the amount of snowfall. But for now, we wait. Winter is coming. Snow is coming, but not today. Today, gray sky and cold rain.

The festive season begins. The Holiday lights and decorated evergreen trees are coming. It is the season of magic and miracles. May there be light and color, joy and laughter–may there be peace and good will.

Comments

Leave a comment
  • Indeed, may it be so. Beautifully put. I hadn't made the connection before, but maybe this is how the milkweed seeds made it into "Waltz of the Flowers" in Disney's "Fantasia." (My favorite part, of course -- leading into the cello solo!)

  • In reply to Margaret H. Laing:

    Thank you, my friend. I don't need to tell you these are dark times. The Hanukkah candles and Christmas lights seem especially meaningful to me this year.
    I'm so glad you like the milkweeds. I couldn't find a photo of grey sky and milkweeds, but that's okay. Thanks again!

  • Snow is coming, but not today.
    Cold rain will fall instead.
    The clouds above us will be gray.
    Snow is coming, but not today.
    La Nina's on deck the weather folks say.
    Which means we'll shovel more snow ahead.
    Snow is coming, but not today.
    Cold rain will fall instead.

  • In reply to Aquinas wired:

    That's so beautiful, AW. Thank you!

  • In reply to Weather Girl:

    Thanks from me, too. That's lovely.

  • La Nina is starting to look like it did in 1982: cold for a couple of days then real warm next week. No indication of prior years' pattern of the Pacific pushing the Polar Vortex to the vicinity of St. Louis, MO.

  • In reply to jack:

    Thanks so much for reading, Jack. You're right, they are forecasting much warmer temperatures next week. Maybe big snow after the warm-up? It's happened before....
    I remember, January and February of 1982 were brutally cold!

  • In reply to Weather Girl:

    I was referring to Dec. 1982 (chart).

    Nobody predicted all the tornadoes last night. Nor that Cheryl Scott's hair would turn black on the 5 p.m. news.

  • In reply to jack:

    Oh, Jack! This tornado outbreak is horrifying. There was possibility of tornados, but not this bad.

  • This is one of my favorite times of year. Summer is gone, but many plants still show their dormant form with exposed seeds--particularly on asters and goldenrods as well as the milkweed you showed. By later in the winter, signs of dormant life are less obvious. Besides, by February winter starts seeming too long.

  • In reply to jnorto:

    Thank you, jnorto. Yes, I love the seeds and berries this time of year. By February, we are ready for spring! More light and buds on the branches...

Leave a comment