It's that time again

Remember that hour we lost when we set the clocks ahead  in the spring?  Lost among the long summer days, maybe you’ve forgotten.

Well, the reminders are  everywhere, today–Time to change the clocks, again. No more Daylight Saving Time. Fall back, remember. Digital clocks will adjust automatically.

And so, in these darkening days of November, here comes that extra hour, back like a beckoning hand. A trick of the light, does it matter?

Midnight becomes eleven, again, because that’s the law, here.

Actually, the time change officially occurs at 2:00 a.m. this Sunday, November 3. Many people will be sleeping through it, but what if you are working then?

For nightshift workers, the time shift  is kind of confusing, and not just because of the reference to Daylight Savings Time.

According to the  U.S. Department of Labor, this is how they figure the hours worked–

 

Daylight Savings Time

Most states participate in daylight savings time. Those employees working the graveyard shift when Daylight Savings Time begins work one hour less because the clocks are set ahead one hour. Those employees working the graveyard shift when Daylight Savings Time ends work an extra hour because the clocks are set back one hour at 2:00 a.m.

For example:

The scheduled shift starts at 11:00 p.m. and ends at 7:30 a.m. the next day, your employee works an eight- hour shift and receives a 30-minute lunch break.

  • On the Sunday that Daylight Savings Time starts at 2:00 a.m., the employee does not work the hour from 2:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. because at 2:00 a.m. all of the clocks are turned forward to 3:00 a.m. Thus, on this day the employee only worked 7 hours, even though the schedule was for 8 hours.
  • On the Sunday that Daylight Savings Time ends at 2:00 a.m., the employee works the hour from 1:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. twice because at 2:00 a.m. all of the clocks are turned back to 1:00 a.m. Thus, on this day the employee worked 9 hours, even though the schedule only reflected 8 hours.

The FLSA requires that employees must be credited with all of the hours actually worked. Therefore, if the employee is in a work situation similar to that described in the above example, he or she worked 7 hours on the day that Daylight Savings Time begins and 9 hours on the day that Daylight Savings Time ends. This assumes, of course, that the employee actually worked the scheduled shift as in our example.

For more information, please contact your local Wage and Hour District Office.

 

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Filed under: seasons

Tags: Daylight Saving Time, FLSA

Comments

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  • My impression (at least in the steel mills) is that one got time and a half for the 9th hour. I doubt though that they docked an hour of pay in spring, but I don't remember.

    A more confusing thing was an Eastern Time Zone cable guide in (I believe) Spring, that had nothing for WGN Superstation at 3 a.m. This was still in the days when they printed cable guides.

  • Thanks, Jack---I always appreciate your clarity, and your comments.

    That Dept. of Labor language seemed amusingly convoluted, of course!

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