Archive for January 2012

Tonight: WMAQ and The Chicago Reporter unite for first investigation

Tune in tonight to WMAQ  at 10p.m. to check out The Chicago Reporter’s first collaboration with our new media partner. Our friends over at WMAQ will be following up on our latest investigation, “Following Finney,” in which we raised a series of questions about how two nonprofits overseen by clout-heavy minister Leon Finney Jr.–The Woodlawn... Read more »

Unjustly fired bakery workers get last paycheck

Unjustly fired bakery workers get last paycheck
This morning, former employees of Rolf’s Patisserie in Lincolnwood are counting a small victory. As regular readers may recall, the company’s 134 employees were let go last month with no notice. To make matters worse, their final paychecks bounced. Today, news is spreading that the company will not only make good on the workers’ last... Read more »

New transition housing for LGBT youth hopes to offer a safe space

New transition housing for LGBT youth hopes to offer a safe space
Being young, as well as being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, comes with its own challenges, but some young people in Chicago face an additional challenge: homelessness. A new transitional housing program in Humboldt Park, El Rescate, hopes to build both community and an accepting space, while also helping LGBT youth off the street. “Queer... Read more »
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Another fly in the school lunch program: abuse

Another fly in the school lunch program: abuse
There is such a thing as a free lunch in Chicago Public Schools. Too many of them, in fact, reports the Chicago Tribune. A new report by CPS’ inspector general James Sullivan shows the free school lunch program is rife with abuse, with parents routinely encouraged to submit fraudulent applications. Thousands of children who don’t... Read more »

Should Illinois pull out of the nationwide 'robo-signing' settlement?

Should Illinois pull out of the nationwide 'robo-signing' settlement?
California did. New York did. Now Nevada, Massachusetts and Delaware may follow suit. And today, citizens of Chicago are calling on Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan to join the growing number of states that have pulled out of a legal settlement that attorney generals from across the nation struck with banks as punishment for improperly... Read more »

What does MLK's legacy mean to you?

Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy means many things, to many people. While out taping our weekly radio show at Carter’s Barbershop in North Lawndale last Friday, The Chicago Reporter spoke with guests, hosts, producers and listeners about King’s legacy and what it means to them. Richard Steele, host and correspondent for WBEZ: Bert Downing, owner... Read more »
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Race and poverty roundup: US citizen deported, the rise of class consciousness and a controversial 'Avoid Ghetto' app

What’s moving in the world of race and poverty, on Chicago Muckrakers weekly. A U.S. teen mistakenly deported to Colombia brings a hailstorm of criticism to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. A stressful early childhood can have long-reaching effects, says Nicholas Kristof in The New York Times, so we should look for a poverty solution... Read more »

Women's shelter hosts winter walk, expands services

Women's shelter hosts winter walk, expands services
It’s not an easy time to try to help the homeless. With the economy still doing poorly and state and local funding drying up, most shelters and service providers are struggling to keep their doors open. But Sarah’s Circle, an agency that aids homeless women in the Uptown community, has found ways to expand. When... Read more »

Subsidized housing and slum landlords

What do you have if you put together a prominent landlord, $300 million in development projects and apartments without heat? Today, tune in to the  Barbershop Show on Vocalo at noon, when we’ll look into what the conditions are in subsidized housing managed by one polarizing figure on the South Sider–Leon Finney Jr. Finney is a... Read more »
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Another state decides to drug test the downtrodden

Add one more to the ranks of states that are slated to start drug testing recipients of public assistance. A South Carolina Senate panel has approved legislation that would drug test applicants for unemployment benefits and require them to do at least 16 hours a week of community service. A Mississippi state senator is also... Read more »