Message from Montie

Movie reviews Archives

Chicago's The New 400 Theater releases Michael Jackson's 'This Is It' but crowd numbers are mediocre

user-pic
Message from Montie

Shamontiel is the author of two novels: "Change for a Twenty" and "Round Trip." Check her out at shamontiel.com.

shamontielbadmj.jpg

Shamontiel thinking she's "bad" (R.I.P. MJ)

I kept hearing the buzz about Michael Jackson's "This Is It," and initially I was not going to see the film. It seemed like a way for other people to get rich instead of honoring the King of Pop's final footage after 10 years of being silent. But The New 400 Theater (located at 6746 N. Sheridan in Chicago's Rogers Park) had the film, and oftentimes I have to go to more expensive and bigger theaters to see the mainstream films. Free popcorn Tuesdays. Evening films are only $7.50, and the first release was tonight at 11:00 p.m. How could I miss out on a deal like that?

 

I bought my ticket as soon as the theater opened today at 4:30 p.m. to beat the crowd and left an hour early to get a good parking spot in the Rogers Park area, where parking spots after 7:00 p.m. are almost pointless. I got my free popcorn and munched on it in my car before "This Is It" started, but when I went back inside, there was only a small crowd. I thought that was so strange because friends and family were telling me "This Was It" was sold out at theaters around them. I figured I was going to have to fight for a seat, but there were full rows with no one in them. What gives? Did others have the same suspicious beliefs I originally did about not supporting a film trying to get rich off of MJ's legacy, were you as surprised as I was that the film made it to The New 400 Theater, or did you just not want to go on a weeknight?

 

Continue reading...

Black hair filmmaker Regina Campbell has a hearing to sue comedian Chris Rock for 'Good Hair'

user-pic
Message from Montie

Shamontiel is the author of two novels: "Change for a Twenty" and "Round Trip." Check her out at shamontiel.com.

goodhair.jpg
 

After seeing Chris Rock's film, "Good Hair" today, I found out that there is a hearing set for October 19, 2009 with Federal District Judge Dale S. Fischer about his film being released. Regina Campbell, the plaintiff, produced a film called "My Nappy Roots" and stated that Chris Rock did not tell her he was producing a film about black hair too before he saw her movie screening. Chris Rock apparently admitted to seeing the film, but there are mixed statements about whether Chris Rock told Regina Campbell about his HBO deal for a black hair film before or after the film.

 

Initially when I heard this news, I was wondering "What's the big deal?" You cannot copyright an idea. I worked with the Library of Congress for two years and read contracts repeatedly to make sure my previous employer's educational textbooks were properly registered. I've seen documentaries on black hair and the perm industry from films like Aron Ranen's black hair care documentary, in which he talked about how black hair care manufacturer Kizure was having a tough time selling its products because of the Asian market taking over, but I never heard about a lawsuit against Aron Ranen. (Ironically, even when I google "black hair manufacturers," I see a bunch of Chinese products.) Aron Ranen isn't trying to sue Chris Rock, although Chris Rock also touched on Koreans and Chinese people were discriminating against black hair care manufacturers.  

Continue reading...

Taraji Henson shines in Tyler Perry's 'I Can Do Bad All By Myself," Madea needs to go

user-pic
Message from Montie

Shamontiel is the author of two novels: "Change for a Twenty" and "Round Trip." Check her out at shamontiel.com.

i-can-do-bad-all-by-myself-poster.jpg

Tyler Perry's "I Can Do Bad All By Myself" movie poster

 A little bit over two years ago today, I wrote "TV Review: Tyler Perry critics complain about Madea and his plots," and at the time, I truly was entertained by Tyler Perry's character Madea. However, all good things must come to an end. I just left the movie theater, and I didn't even watch the end credits with the jokes from Madea and her brother, Joe. I heard people cracking up laughing listening to the jokes from Madea, but considering I'd already seen the play version of "I Can Do Bad All By Myself," I found the jokes to be a little lame.

 

The plot is indeed the same plot that Tyler Perry continues to tell: child molestation, drug addicts, learning to love, broken families, a little bit of religion and some excellent gospel singers. The same Hollywood industry that was skeptical of Tyler Perry's creativity and whether "black folks actually talk like that" turned down this millionaire screenwriter and playwright. And while I respect his goals and want him to succeed, I really want him to finally put Madea to rest.

 

 

Continue reading...

Most Active Pages Right Now

ChicagoNow.com on Facebook