Message from Montie

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Alpha Kappa Alphas and Alpha Phi Alphas win Chicago Sprite Step Off

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Message from Montie

Shamontiel is the author of two novels: "Change for a Twenty" and "Round Trip." Check her out at shamontiel.com.

The AKAs are on a "mission" to win!

3/20/2010 Update: Click here to read about the Atlanta finale.1/24/2010: When I heard about the Sprite Step Off from FoxBrownFox and Commonground, I was sold from the beginning. But when SpriteStepOff.com advertised that it would be the largest step show in history, I was wondering how true that'd be. However, on Saturday night (Jan. 23) when I drove up to the Regal Theater and saw cars backed down the block of 1645 E. 79th St., and the line to get into the Regal around the corner, I knew this was going to be something serious. And the Regal completely sold out of tickets. Largest step show in history? Looked like it. But would it be the livest step show I'd ever seen? That was the test. I've seen many throughout my college years (Lincoln University alumni!), plus the numerous step shows I've seen all over the world even after I graduated.

Well, this Sprite Step Off was not playing around. Hands down the Sprite Step Off is definitely my all-time favorite step show, and it was definitely the livest!

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Updated 1/25/2010

The original winners announced at the Sprite StepOff on Sat., Jan. 23, were the following:

Sororities: $21,500 Alpha Kappa Alpha (first place); $16,000 Zeta Phi Beta (second place); $11,000 Alpha Theta Omega (third place)

Fraternities: $21,500 Alpha Phi Alpha (Central State University, first place);  $16,000 Phi Beta Sigma (second place); $11,000 Alpha Phi Alpha (St. Louis citywide chapter, third place)

 

However, 360i and FoxBrownFox PR were notified on Mon., Jan. 25, that there was a voting discrepancy for the sororities during Saturday night's event. According to the Sprite Facebook page, "In the spirit of sportsmanship, we also advised the other two teams who were originally announced as the second and third place winners (now third and fourth place winners), that we wanted them to keep the prize money they had been awarded." So here are the updated sorority winners with corrected prize amounts. 

Sororities: $21,500 Alpha Kappa Alpha (first place); $16,000 Sigma Gamma Rho (second place) and $16,000 Zeta Phi Beta (third place); $11,000 Alpha Theta Omega (fourth place)  

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But just telling you who the winners are doesn't do them any justice. You need proof, right? Check out some of the photos and a video of Greek strolling in the crowd that I took at the Sprite Step Off on Saturday, Jan. 23.

 

 

Gallery sneak peek (58 images):

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Pyramid Productions presents 'Crossed,' a play about Greek life effects (photo gallery and video incl.)

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Message from Montie

Shamontiel is the author of two novels: "Change for a Twenty" and "Round Trip." Check her out at shamontiel.com.

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A A-likes reveal themselves to college crowd.

 

 

 

Pyramid Productions playwright Calvin Leroy King III presents "Crossed," a play about Black Greek life and the effects it has on a Greek pledge and his non-Greek friends and family. This play is being shown at the DuSable Museum of African-American History, 740 E. 56th Place at 7 p.m. on Nov. 27 and Nov. 28.

 

Special thank you to Sheila Black (Production Specialist of "Crossed" and a superb intern I met while working at the Chicago Defender) for sharing some of her photos. 

 

Click here to read my review of this play.

Check out photos and video footage from the event below.

Gallery sneak peek (10 images):

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How Urban Equities saved me from Chicago real estate nightmares

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Message from Montie

Shamontiel is the author of two novels: "Change for a Twenty" and "Round Trip." Check her out at shamontiel.com.

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Me sitting on the front porch of my Missouri apartment in 2002

I've lived in three states within the past decade during my university years. I've gone from dorms to off-campus apartments to the south side of Chicago to the north side of Chicago, and I've had my fair share of real estate company tales.

 

In Missouri, my real estate company was okay, but they wanted to charge me for utility issues that had nothing to do with me and everything to do with the building being old. But the rent in Jefferson City, Missouri (Lincoln University is my alma mater) was $225 for a one-bedroom apartment in a beautiful neighborhood. No sane person is going to pass that up, especially when they know the rent prices living in bigger cities. However, I had a neighbor who blasted loud music and wanted to leave her trash on the steps instead of using the correct trash bags. We ended up in a bag throwing argument and the police were called--she was ticketed and I went back in the house to sleep. That was my one nightmare moment with neighbors.

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CNN's 'Latino in America' and Holy Trinity Catholic Church bring back memories of bilingual goals

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Message from Montie

Shamontiel is the author of two novels: "Change for a Twenty" and "Round Trip." Check her out at shamontiel.com.

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I have been looking forward to CNN's "Latino in America" for months, but while watching tonight's episode and hearing both sides of the divide in St. Ann, Missouri's Holy Trinity Catholic Church (nicknamed Holy Trinity Hispanic Church), all I could do was shake my head. Neither group seems to be making a great effort to know the other--the Latino side because some are uncomfortable that they aren't fluent in English and the English side because they feel like Latinos should learn English. I disagree with both. They both need to meet in the middle. English is not the official language in the United States, and we're constantly bragging about being a big melting pot but then contradicting ourselves by trying to force others to learn what's popular.

 

When I was in high school, I loved chatting with a gorgeous gray-eyed young man in my homeroom named Jose. We met the first day of high school and stayed cool throughout the years until he was killed in an auto accident my junior year. I'd always ask him to say something in Spanish to me so I could translate it. I took Spanish classes throughout high school, and a good associate of mine named Angie (who also went to my alma mater Morgan Park) would hang out with me at the bus stop and I'd ask her to speak in Spanish too because I was trying to get better. I wanted to be bilingual, not just to talk to both of them because they were bilingual but just to learn something new.

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