Message from Montie

African-American history Archives

On the 2010 Census report, will you be classified as a Negro?

user-pic
Message from Montie

Shamontiel is the author of two novels: "Change for a Twenty" and "Round Trip." Check her out at shamontiel.com.

Black Panther Party.jpg

This is me showing off the back of the shirt I wore to my cousin's '70s party.

I'm a 28-year-old Negro.

 

If you're looking at your screen with a perplexed expression, that was the same reaction I had when I read that the Census still has the term "Negro" on their 2010 questionnaire. The last time I participated in the Census, there was a guy strolling through the dorms to get college kids' responses, but for the life of me, I don't recall him asking me if I was "Black, African-American or Negro." If he did, I'd have probably thought he was trying to be funny and slammed the door.

 

But according to BlackVoices.com, more than 56,000 people filled in the blank line for race category with the term "Negro." I didn't even know people used the word. My 97-year-old great great aunt has always called herself black and Creole. My 87-year-old grandfather likes to rile me up by calling me "colored," but for the most part he says black or African-American.

 

As far as I can tell, the term "Negro" stopped being used in the '50s so why the Census is still using it today is just plain ironic. The purpose of the Census is to get up-to-date information on the people living in our world, but they're using outdated terms to do it. Isn't that a little hypocritical?

 

Continue reading...

Chicago businesses celebrate upcoming release of 'The Princess and the Frog' with mother-daughter Princess Coronation Weekend

user-pic
Message from Montie

Shamontiel is the author of two novels: "Change for a Twenty" and "Round Trip." Check her out at shamontiel.com.

Princess Tiana Chicago Tribune AP.jpg

In this film publicity image released by Disney, Princess Tiana, voiced by Anika Noni Rose, left, and Prince Naveen, voiced by Bruno Campos, are shown in a scene from the animated film, "The Princess and the Frog." (AP Photo/Disney)

On December 11, Walt Disney Animation Studios presents "The Princess and the Frog," and Diamonds & Lace EventScaping plans to honor more African-American princesses next Friday too with their Princess Coronation Weekend in Chicago.

 

"'The Princess and the Frog' was more or less the inspiration for the Princess Coronation Weekend," said Relana Johnson, co-owner of Diamonds & Lace EventScaping. "An affiliate of ours is handling the private screening of the film, and we felt that this was just too historical of an event to just limit it to the private screening. Everyone in the community is excited about it."

 

The film, "The Princess and the Frog," is about an African-American young lady named Tiana who meets a frog prince trying to become human again. Their chance encounter and a kiss lead them into the lively Louisiana bayous.

 

"The Disney princess franchise is a billion-dollar franchise, and for them to take note that the African-American buying power of women, children, parents, grandparents is worth giving us a princess that people in our community can identify with makes it a big deal," Johnson said.

 

Continue reading...

Most Active Pages Right Now

ChicagoNow.com on Facebook