Almost 600 Cities Join The Million Father March, Dads & Men Escorting Children Back To School September 6th

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New York City,
Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Syracuse, Long Island, Westbury, Freeport,
Hempstead, Rochester, Westchester, Mount Vernon, New Rochelle, Harlem
and Yonkers, New York Join
the Million Father March

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New York State Kicks Off This Year’s Take Your Child to School Initiative; Expects over 50 Schools Across the State
 
Encouraging Men to Sign-up for the President’s Fatherhood and Mentoring Initiative
  
The
NYS Office of Children and Family Services and the NYS Office of
Temporary and Disability Assistance (OCFS/OTDA) will coordinate a state
wide initiative, which we have named “Dads Take Your Child to School”.
The initiative inspired by the Black Star Project’s Million Father March
will take place on or near the beginning of the school year, we call on
all concerned, interested and committed fathers, relatives, and
significant male caregivers to take their children to school and to
remain involved in their child’s education throughout the school year.
This year the event is scheduled for September 21st  (13th in New York
City).
 
Last Year we had over 30 schools involved from across the
state to include (Albany, Buffalo, Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Syracuse,
Long Island (Westbury, Freeport & Hempstead), Rochester,
Westchester, Mount Vernon, New Rochelle, and Yonkers. As the reporting
schools continue to pour in, we look for even greater numbers this year.
 
Fathers, grandfathers, foster fathers, stepfathers, uncles,
cousins, big brothers, significant male caregivers, mentors and friends
of the family participate in the event.  Men of all races, nationalities
and faith backgrounds, and also women, are encouraged to take children
to school on this special day. In addition we encourage schools to
embrace these caregivers by providing them with vital school information
and ways to volunteer in school activities. ie. PTO/A, event planning,
tutoring; etc.
 
Participation is very simple. Schools are asked
to register with The NYS OCFS/OTDA Take Your Child To School initiative,
develop a resolution in support of the initiative, support the Take
Your Child To School initiative prior to the first day of school by
talking about the value of men in the educational process of their
children’s lives. You can do this by contacting: Gregory Owens at 518
473-5899, Greg.owens@ocfs.state.ny.us or Kenneth Braswell at 518
408-4971, Kenneth.Braswell@otda.state.ny.us
 
This year we are
also proud to encourage fathers to sign up for the President’s
Fatherhood and Mentoring Initiative to receive updates on the work of
responsible fatherhood and mentoring. For more information on the
initiative, to sign-up on line or receive hard copies of the cards;
visit www.fatherhood.gov.
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Schools
can also ask community and faith based organizations to adopt a school
and work with that school throughout the school year; create a Father
(and Parent) Friendly atmosphere in the school setting that will
encourage and invite Dads and father figures to participate; consider
participating in the Pre-Take Your Child to School webinar; encourage
your school to view the “Creating Friendly Fatherhood Environments”
webcast on September 21st (time to be determined).
 
There are three ways New Yorkers can participate on Tuesday, September 21st:
 
Organize
a Dads Take Your Child to School Day event at your school to encourage
fathers and father-figures to get involved in their child’s school.  For
ideas, resources, and to register your school for Dads Take Your Child
to School Day please visit: http://www.ocfs.state.ny.us/main/fatherhood/
 
Attend “Creating Father Friendly Schools” Video Web Cast from 2:30
PM – 4:30 PM for administration personnel, teachers, BOCES staff,
PTA/PTOs, Child Care Agency Administrators and Pre School Agency
Administrators.
Sign the President’s Fatherhood and Mentoring Initiative Pledge Card @ www.fatherhood.gov
 
NOTE: The web cast will include presentations onthe importance
of male involvement in the educational setting, obstacles to father
involvement in schools, and strategies and tools to increase male
involvement in the educational setting.  During the course of the
program, participants will be able to send in questions and feedback for
guests by email.
 
Pre-registration for this webinar is required.  Please respond to teleconferences@ocfs.state.ny.us with
the words “Dads webcast” in the subject line.  Please also provide your
name, school or organizational affiliation, a contact phone number and
approximate number of attendees at your location. 
 
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KENNETH BRASWELL
Director
New York State Fatherhood Initiative
www.dads.ny.gov 
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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

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Gary and East Chicago, Indiana Join
the Million Father March 

  
Million Father March
helps promote education

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Clifton Johnson, left,
vice-president of the School City of East Chicago board, joins
Superintendent Michael Harding and members of the Boys & Girls Clubs
of Gary at a Monday press conference promoting the Million Father
March.
 
By Lauri Harvey Keagle – August 17, 2010

GARY, Indiana – Keanu Patterson knows why men are important in his life.
 
“The father or father figure will try to keep you out of trouble,”
the 14-year-old freshman at West Side Freshman Academy said. “He will
lead you away from drugs, alcohol and having a child before it’s time.”
 
Patterson joined elected officials, school representatives and
local leaders at Gary’s Boys & Girls Club on Monday to promote the
Million Father March. The event, which begins on the first day of
school, calls on men to walk children to school and continue their
involvement in and out of the classroom throughout the school year.
 
In Gary, students return to school Wednesday.
 
“Statistics show when a father is involved in a child’s life, they
fare better in school,” said Bennie Muhammad, executive director of the
Gary Commission on the Social Status of Black Males, which is organizing
the city’s participation in the event. “Women make women and men make
men. We’re asking men to be a part of their child’s life.”
 
This is the third year Gary has participated in the event. This
year, the Gary Commission on the Social Status of Black Males is being
joined in sponsoring the event by several religious groups and the
NAACP, the Lake County Drug Free Alliance among others.
The Million Father March started in Chicago in 2003 and spread to 600 cities with 800,000 men participating.
 
The project is managed nationally by The Black Star Project, USA,
and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male
Achievement.
 
Gary Mayor Rudy Clay encouraged men to take children to school,
“then meet their teachers, talk to their teachers, be there for the
report cards.”
 
“We’re endorsing this right here in Gary, Ind., because not only is
it the right thing to do, it’s crucial to their education,” Clay said.
 
Lake County Sheriff Rogelio “Roy” Dominguez said he knows all too well the role men play in young people’s lives.
 
“Statistics show that when a father figure is absent in the house,
it is a factor in why some young men end up in our jail,” Dominguez
said.
 
Michael Harding, superintendent for the School City of East Chicago, said the economy makes the project all the more important.
 
“All public schools need help,” Harding said. “We are no longer in
the position where we can do the important work for these students by
ourselves.”
 
Kelly Williams, pastor of Greater Destiny Bible Church in East
Chicago, is helping to organize his city’s event. East Chicago students
return to school Monday.
 
“Our call is to let our children know they’re kings, they’re
queens, they’re greatness,” Williams said. “It is our duty and
responsibility to step up to the plate and let our kids be all they can
be.”
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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
Joins the Million Father March



 

CONTACT: Mr. David Fattah, Coordinator – 2010 National Million Father March
House Of Umoja, Inc. (www.houseofumoja.org)
Telephone: (215) 473-5893
E-Mail: falakafattah@aol.com
 

    
PHILADELPHIA, PA (USA) – 19 AUGUST 2010 – On Tuesday, 7 September 2010 –
the first day of the 2010-2011 academic year for the School District of
Philadelphia — Fathers throughout the City of Philadelphia will
participate in the 2010 National Million Father March by escorting their
children to school. The House of Umoja, Inc. (www.houseofumoja.org) is
organizing and leading the 2010 National Million Father March under the
theme “Violence Free Schools” throughout the City of Philadelphia. The
City of Philadelphia is one of approximately 492 American cities
participating in the 2010 National Million Fathers March which is
facilitated by Phillip Jackson, its creator, and the Founder and
Executive Director of the Chicago, Illinois-based Black Star Project (www.blackstarproject.org).

    
“The theme for the 2010 National Million Fathers March in the City of
Philadelphia is ‘Violence Free Schools’. We are asking all Fathers in
every neighborhood throughout the City of Philadelphia to escort their
children to school on Tuesday, 7 September 2010; to pick up a copy of
their child’s academic roster and the Academic Calendar of Events from
their child’s school; and to encourage their child to commit to
nonviolence by signing the Imani Pledge™. We would like Fathers to meet
the principal and teachers of their child’s school. We are calling on
Fatherhood Practitioners, social entrepreneurs, male parenting
organizations, faith-based organizations, religious institutions,
businesses, legislators, grassroots community organizations, health care
professionals and providers, social services professionals and
providers, and concerned citizens throughout the City of Philadelphia to
encourage Fathers to participate in the 2010 National Million Father
March; help to move our children to commit to nonviolence; and provide
incentives for our children to excel academically. We all have a vested
interest in making sure that our schools are free of violence and
placing our children on a path that will help them become productive and
successful adults,” explained Mr. David Fattah, the Coordinator for the
2010 National Million Father March in the City of Philadelphia.
    
In an op-ed article entitled, Fathers ‘March’ To Bring Peace To Our
Schools, published in the 10 August 2010 edition of The Philadelphia
Tribune (page 10-A) and authored by Philip Jackson, the creator of the
National Million Father March and Founder and Executive Director of the
Black Star Project, points to the National Million Father March as the
solution to youth violence in America.
     “Instead of relying on
police and further criminalizing our children, our solution to youth
violence in America is the Million Father March, which means involving a
multitude of fathers in the continuing educational and social
development of their children. Our youth need male role models and
fathers to provide guidance and supportive discipline, and our marching
fathers can provide this and do what the police have not done and cannot
do – bring peace to schools and communities across America. Last year,
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan helped lead more than 625,000
fathers and other men in 500 cities in taking children back to school on
the first day during our 2009 Million Father March. This year, more
than 800,000 men in 600 cities will be taking their children to school
on the first day for the 2010 Million Father March,” Mr. Jackson wrote.
    
In addition to organizing citywide participation in the 2010 National
Million Fathers March on Tuesday, 7 September 2010, the House of Umoja,
Inc. will conduct a march from its office at 5625 West Master Street to
the Guion S. Bluford Elementary School located at 5801 Media Street. Men
are being asked to gather beginning at 7:00 A.M. at the House of Umoja,
Inc. on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 for a light breakfast before marching
to the Guion S. Bluford Elementary School in observance of the 2010
National Million Father March. 
     Individuals and organizations
interested in supporting and participating in the 2010 National Million
Father March in the City of Philadelphia should contact Mr. David Fattah
at (215) 473-5893 or send an e-mail to: falakafattah@aol.com
and are cordially invited to attend Planning Meetings for the 2010
National Million Father March which will occur on Saturdays beginning at
3:00 P.M. at 5625 West Master Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
through Saturday, 5 September 2010.
For further information about the House of Umoja, Inc., visit the organization’s website at www.houseofumoja.org or call the organization at (215) 473-5893.
    
For further information about the 2010 National Million Father March,
visit the website of the Black Star Project at www.blackstarproject.org
or send an e-mail to: blackstar1000@ameritech.net.
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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

Broward County, Florida, Joins
the Million Father March


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In
Broward County, Florida, 36,875 (official count) fathers and men took
children to school on the first day of school last year. They may get
45,000 fathers and men this year.  Why can’t this happen in your city
and in your community?  It can!
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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

East St. Louis Illinois Joins
the Million Father March


East St. Louis mayor encourages fathers to be involved in students’ education
 
 
East St. Louis Mayor holds a flyer
promoting the Million Father March, an event that gains momentum by
getting fathers to escort their sons and daughters to the first day
school. Studies have shown that when a man is involved in students’
education, the students perform better.
 
Parks is joined by the general
manager of Aaron’s Sales and Lease store on Camp Jackson Road in Cahokia
and a representative of the Blackstarproject that has commitments from
492 cities across America that are participating in the Million Father
March.
 
The 100 Black Men of Chicago were
proud to assist with literature and distribution and are looking forward
to Real Men Read in our local schools as well as their eighth annual
College Scholarship fair. For information, go to www.100bmc.org.
 
Submitted by Devin McCormick.
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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.


Omaha, Nebraska Joins
the Million Father March

  
Black Men Inspire
“Million Father March Day”

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Posted on August 17th, 2010 – By Bossip Staff

Million man, million woman,
million midget….now add The Million Father March to the list. The
Mayor of Omaha has created a special day to honor FATHERS (we didn’t say
baby daddies) after being inspired by a group called Black Men United.
 
For
the past three years, Black Men United has organized a growing group of
fathers who bring their children to school on the 1st day.
The Omaha
group hopes a small movement of 50 fathers bringing their children to
school will eventually spark a citywide effort to get thousands doing
the same thing.
 
Willie Hamilton has become a
staple on the first day of school at Mount View Elementary. All three of
his children attended and graduated. 
 
A member of Black
Men United since its inception, Hamilton helped organize a group of
fathers who bring their children to school. It is now an integral part
of Million Father March Day, which Mayor Jim Suttle declared this year.
 
“I love this school. I love this area,” Hamilton said. 
 
“Kids
remember the smallest things – a touch, a word, to see men doing
positive things – I think it really inspires them to be more positive.”
This
sounds like a move in the right direction. Hopefully, Black men in
particular will realize the power they have to affect the lives of their
children.
 
Taking your own child to school (and
being involved beyond the first day) should be the rule, not the
exception. Don’t just BE in their lives… STAY in them because a
parent’s job is never done. Don’t believe us, ask Laurence Fishburne. 
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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

Palmdale, California Joins 
the Million Father March

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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

 Nashville, Tennessee Joins
the Million Father March


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 Fathers must boost
 children’s education

 
By Dwight Lewis


Aug. 1, 2010,

I
was sit­ting at my desk Wednes­day when I received an e-mail from a
col­league say­ing, “Dwight, FYI, in case you want to write about this
and the need for some­one to do it in Nashville.”
 
Dwight Lewis
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I’m
always open for sug­ges­tions, and when a good one comes my way I
pounce on it. And this was one col­umn idea that I was sold on
imme­di­ately. One rea­son is that it had to do with fathers and
chil­dren and school.

 
Accom­pa­ny­ing
the e-mail was an arti­cle by Phillip Jack­son, founder and exec­u­tive
direc­tor of The Black Star Project, which is based in Chicago and
pro­motes excel­lence in edu­ca­tion. The group is push­ing the Mil­lion
Father March, hop­ing to get 800,000 fathers and men in 600 cities to
take chil­dren to school on their first day.
 
“Youth
vio­lence rages out of con­trol in most major cities across Amer­ica,”
Jack­son wrote. “Schools can­not con­trol, com­mu­ni­ties can­not
con­trol and police can­not con­trol youth violence….
 
“Instead
of rely­ing on police and fur­ther crim­i­nal­iz­ing our chil­dren, our
solu­tion to youth vio­lence in Amer­ica is the Mil­lion Father March,
which means involv­ing a mul­ti­tude of fathers in the con­tin­u­ing
edu­ca­tional and social devel­op­ment of their children.
 
“Our
youth need male role-models and fathers to pro­vide guid­ance and
sup­port­ive dis­ci­pline, and our march­ing fathers can pro­vide this
and do what the police have not done and can­not do – bring peace to
schools and com­mu­ni­ties across America.”
 
Last
year, U.S. Sec­re­tary of Edu­ca­tion Arne Dun­can helped lead more
than 625,000 fathers and other men in 500 cities in tak­ing chil­dren
back to school on the first day, accord­ing to the Black Star Project.
 
While
I write to endorse this effort by the Black Star Project and to urge
fathers and men in Nashville and through­out Mid­dle Ten­nessee to get
involved, let me say that I’ve endorsed such efforts in the past and
will con­tinue to do so as long as I’m able to.
 
Back
in 1994, for exam­ple, I wrote about my visit one day to Nashville’s
Cald­well Early Child­hood Learn­ing Cen­ter, where the prin­ci­pal
looked me straight in the eye and asked: “Mr. Lewis, where are the black
fathers?” Being the father of a 16-year-old son at the time, I wrote
that I was puz­zled by the ques­tion as Myron Oglesby-Pitts asked again:
“Where are the black fathers?”
 
Ninety
per­cent of the 250 stu­dents at Cald­well were black at the time, but
only six fathers had shown up that school year to see about their
children.
 
“When my school doors open,” said Oglesby-Pitts, “I see moms come up but hardly ever any fathers. Where are they?”
 
Sin­cere
as sin­cere could be, Oglesby-Pitts added: “I want the black fathers to
come forth. You have to do more than just bring a baby into this world
to be a real father. And if the bio­log­i­cal fathers don’t come
for­ward, I’m call­ing on other strong African-American men to come and
fill their shoes.”
 
All
the fathers I knew did that, but even one father not tak­ing his child
or chil­dren to school is one too many, regard­less of whether that
par­tic­u­lar father is black, brown, white or whatever.
 
Fathers
need to be there with the teach­ers to lend a help­ing hand and to
encour­age our chil­dren to get a good edu­ca­tion so they can have a
much bet­ter life.
 
So
when the school doors open for the 2010-11 school year, make sure you
take your child or somebody’s child to school, and not only that, but
make sure they’re going to school through­out the year and are get­ting
the guid­ance and sup­port­ive dis­ci­pline they need to be successful.
 
I
don’t know too many other things that are more impor­tant in life, and I
hope every­one who reads this col­umn today will urge fathers and other
men to get more involved with chil­dren when it comes to education.
 
As
Myron Olglesby-Pitts told me, “When I have a father come forth, you can
see the dif­fer­ence in how a child acts. Some of them seem to have a
lit­tle more respect for adult­hood when a man is present.”
And you can’t beat that.
 
Dwight Lewis is edi­to­r­ial page edi­tor for The Ten­nessean. His col­umn appears Sun­days and Thurs­days. E-mail: dlewis@tennessean.com.

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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

 

Evanston, Illinois Joins
the Million Father March

 

 

Evanston, D65 promote

walking to school
8/17/10
By Jonathan Bullington / Trib – Local reporter
 
With the first day of school approaching Aug. 30, the city of
Evanston and Evanston/Skokie School District 65 are both promoting the
benefits of walking to school.
 
During the first week of school, the city’s health department has
organized a Walk Week program, designed to promote physical activity
among students. The program is designed to encourage students to make
physical activity a part of their daily routines and to remind students
of the importance of school attendance.
 
The free program is in line with First Lady Michelle Obama’s
national initiative to promote physical activity among children, said
Health Department Director Evonda Thomas.
 
“Ultimately, when you look at physical activity, our goal is to
decrease obesity rates in children and the Evanston community as a
whole,” Thomas said. “This program is a free, non-judgmental way to get
our youth moving.”
 
Students need not register to participate in the program. Those who
wish to participate can pick up a free wristband starting Aug. 25 at
Evanston libraries, recreation centers and the McGaw YMCA and YWCA.
 
District 65 is also touting the importance of walking by
participating in the sixth annual Million Father March. The march is
organized by the Black Star Project, a Chicago-based organization that
works to improve student achievement and community life in black and
Latino communities across the country.
 
About 500 schools across the country are expected to participate in
the program, which encourages the male figures in a student’s life to
walk with them to school on the first day.
 
Organizers of the march say that children whose fathers take an
active role in their education perform better in school and are more
likely to graduate from high school and attend college. The march also
encompasses an element of safety and support for children.
 
“Gang recruitment, bullying and random violence goes way down on
any day that a group of men are at a school,” said Phillip Jackson,
Black Star Project executive director.
District 65 Superintendent Hardy Murphy said the district was glad
to participate in the march and its mission to support education.
 
“Parenting is the most important responsibility any adult can
have,” Murphy said. “When families show their support for education, it
is a way to inspire their children to excellence.”
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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

 

Miami and Dade County, Florida Join 
the Million Father March

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Million Father March Will Help Stop Violence In American Schools On First Day And Every Day

800,000 Fathers and Men in 600 Cities Will Take Children to Schools on Their First Day
 
10 August 2010, Miami -Youth violence rages out of control in most
major cities across America. Schools cannot control, communities cannot
control and police cannot control youth violence. Stories of children
maiming and killing other children dominate the news every day in too
many American cities. Many students and out-of-school youth rob and
fight other students and steal and vandalize properties near the
schools.
 
Instead of relying on police and further criminalizing American
children, The Black Star Project’s solution to youth violence in America
is the Million Father March, which means involving a multitude of
fathers and other connected and interested men in the continuing
educational and social development of their children. American youth
need male role-models and fathers to provide guidance and supportive
discipline, and the marching fathers and other men of the Million Father
March can provide this and do what the police have not done and cannot
do – bring peace to schools and communities across America.
 
Last year, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan helped lead more
than 625,000 fathers and men in 500 cities to take children back to
school on the first day during the 2009 Million Father March. This year,
more than 800,000 men in 600 cities will be taking their children to
school on the first day for the 2010 Million Father March.
 
In many communities, when fathers and men are at schools on the
first day, the environment is orderly, productive and peaceful. When
fathers and other men are absent from some schools on the first day or
on any day, those schools tend to become disorderly, chaotic, violent
and too often dangerous places for the students who attend these schools
and the adults who work there. The Million Father March is the best way
to regain that control and to establish a calm, productive, learning
environment for students.
 
Research shows that children whose fathers take an active role in
their educational lives earn better grades, get better test scores,
enjoy school more and are more likely to graduate from high school and
attend college. Additionally, children have fewer behavior problems when
fathers listen to and talk with them regularly and remain steadfastly
active in their lives.
 
Phillip Jackson, executive director of The Black Star Project said,
“An effective father is part of an effective parent team that is
critical to creating a strong family structure. And strong family
structures produce children who are more academically proficient,
socially developed and self-assured. Better parents also produce better
communities, better schools, and better students with higher academic
achievements. Such children become adults who are valuable assets to
their communities.”
 
The Million Father March is not just a one-day event. It is a
year-long commitment that men make to children and their families. This
commitment includes volunteering at schools as mentors, tutors, coaches,
janitors, chaperones and school-board members. The Million Father March
also supportively encourages fathers to be active on weekends by taking
their children to worship at churches, mosques and synagogues and to
museums, cultural centers, hands-on science exhibits and athletic
events.
 
On the first day of school, the yearly Million Father March
provides an escort of safety, support and encouragement to children of
all ages. Gang recruitment, bullies and violence vanish any day that a
group of men are present at schools. Participants in the March include
fathers, grandfathers, foster fathers, stepfathers, uncles, cousins, big
brothers, significant male caregivers and family friends.
 
Although the Million Father March is created by Black men, women
and men of all ethnicities are encouraged to participate by taking their
children to school on their first day. We ask businesses to give
fathers and other participating men two hours off from work that morning
to take their children to school. And finally, we are making a special
effort to coordinate Latino Fathers in La Marcha de los Padres 2010.
Please either join the men in your city or help organize them to be part
of the Million Father March 2010.  
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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement

National Association of
Black Social Workers Joins
the Million Father March


Black Star Logo 
Million Father March 2010

The
Black Star Project Is Calling On One Million Fathers and Men Across
America and the World to Take their Children Back to School on the First
Day this Coming School Year in 600 Cities. There is no reason for the
men in your city or your community or your home or your church not to
participate in the education of children…except if you do not ask them
to! Join the Million Father March 2010!
 
The
only thing that stands between the children of your community receiving
an excellent education or not is your involvement, or lack of it, in
their education! Will you join the Million Father March? It is easy! It
does not take much time. It does not take much money. We give you
everything you need to succeed. It only takes you wanting to make a
difference in the lives of your children and children in your
community. 
 
Please
call Bruce at 773.285.9600 to register your city and Chapter  for the
Million Father March 2010 and to get an organizing kit. You may also
respond to blackstar1000@ameritech.net.
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Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

585 Cities Have Signed Up for
the 2010 Million Father March
If your city has not signed
up, why not? There is still plenty of time to put strong positive men in
the lives of children in your community.  If school has already started
in your city, you can still participate in the National Men Take Children to School Day on Tuesday, September 7, 2010.  You are the ONE who can make the difference in your community!

Black Star Logo 

List of  2010 MFM Cities as of August 20, 2010
City, State   


  1. Adelanto, California
  2. Albany, New York
  3. Albemarle, North Carolina
  4. Alorton, Illinois
  5. Alsip, Illinois
  6. Angelus Oaks, California
  7. Ann Arbor, Michigan”
  8. Anson County, North Carolina
  9. Apex, North Carolina
  10. Apple River, Illinois
  11. Apple Valley, California
  12. Asheboro, North Carolina
  13. Asheville, North Carolina
  14. Atlanta, Georgia
  15. Atlantic Beach, North Carolina
  16. Aurora, Illinois
  17. Austin, Texas
  18. Avant, Alabama
  19. Aventura, Florida
  20. Bakersfield, California
  21. Bal Harbor Islands, Florida
  22. Bal Harbour, Florida
  23. Baldwin, California
  24. Baltimore, Maryland
  25. Banning, California
  26. Barstow, California
  27. Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  28. Bay Pine, Florida
  29. Beach Park, Illinois
  30. Beacon, Alabama
  31. Beacon, New York
  32. Beaumont, California
  33. Beaumont, Texas
  34. Bedford Heights, Ohio
  35. Bedford, Ohio
  36. Belleair Beach, Florida
  37. Belleair Bluffs, Florida
  38. Belleair Shore, Florida
  39. Belleair, Florida
  40. Belleville, Illinois
  41. Bellevue, Nebraska
  42. Bellwood, Illinois
  43. Belmont, North Carolina
  44. Benton Harbor, Michigan
  45. Berkley, Illinois
  46. Berwyn, Illinois
  47. Bessemer, Alabama
  48. Bessener, North Carolina
  49. Bettendorf, Iowa
  50. Beverly Hills, California
  51. Big Bear Lake, California
  52. Billon County, South Carolina
  53. Biscayne Park, Florida
  54. Black Mountain, North Carolina
  55. Bladen County, North Carolina
  56. Bloomfield, Connecticut
  57. Bloomington, California
  58. Blue Island, Illinois
  59. Blythe, California
  60. Bolling, Alabama
  61. Boone, North Carolina
  62. Brandon, Florida
  63. Brevard, North Carolina
  64. Brook Park, Ohio
  65. Brooklyn Heights, Ohio
  66. Brooklyn, Ohio
  67. Broward County, Florida
  68. Brushy Creek, Alabama
  69. Buffalo, New York
  70. Burlington, North Carolina
  71. Butler Springs, Alabama
  72. Cahokia, Illinois
  73. Calimesa, California
  74. Calumet City, Illinois
  75. Camden, Alabama
  76. Camden, New Jersey
  77. Camp Pendelton, California
  78. Canyon Lake, California
  79. Carrboro, North Carolina
  80. Cary, North Carolina
  81. Cathedral City, California
  82. Centreville, Illinois
  83. Chapel Hill, North Carolina
  84. Chapman, Alabama
  85. Charlotte, North Carolina
  86. Chatham County, North Carolina
  87. Chesterfield County, South Carolina
  88. Chicago – North Side, Illinois
  89. Chicago – West Side, Illinois
  90. Chicago Heights, Illinois
  91. Chicago- South Side, Illinois
  92. Chino Hills, California
  93. Chino, California
  94. Chula Vista, California
  95. Claremont, California
  96. Clayton, North Carolina
  97. Clemmons, North Carolina
  98. Cleveland Heights, Ohio
  99. Cleveland, Ohio
  100. Clinton, North Carolina
  101. Coachella, California
  102. Coconut Creek, Florida
  103. College Park, Georgia
  104. Colton, California
  105. Columbia, Missouri
  106. Columbus, Georgia
  107. Columbus, Ohio
  108. Concord, North Carolina
  109. Conley, Georgia
  110. Conover, North Carolina
  111. Cooper City, Florida
  112. Coral Gables, Florida
  113. Coral Springs, Florida
  114. Cornelius, North Carolina
  115. Corona, California
  116. Coronado, California
  117. Country Club Hills, Illinois
  118. Crafton, California
  119. Crestline, California
  120. Crystal Beach, Florida
  121. Culver City, California
  122. Cumberland County, North Carolina
  123. Cuyahoga Heights, Ohio
  124. Dade City, Florida
  125. Dallas, Texas
  126. Dania Beach, Florida
  127. Darlington County, South Carolina
  128. Davenport, Iowa
  129. Davidson, North Carolina
  130. Davie, Florida
  131. Decatur, Georgia
  132. Deerfield Beach, Florida
  133. DeKalb, Illinois
  134. Del Mar, California
  135. Denver, Colorado
  136. Des Moines, Iowa
  137. Desert Hot Springs, California
  138. Detroit, Michigan
  139. Daisy, Alabama
  140. Dixmoor, Illinois
  141. Dolton, Illinois
  142. Doral, Florida
  143. Dothan, Alabama
  144. Dover, Florida
  145. Dunedin, Florida
  146. Dunn, North Carolina
  147. Durham, North Carolina
  148. East Chapman, Alabama
  149. East Chicago, Indiana
  150. East Cleveland, Ohio
  151. East Los Angeles, California
  152. East Moline, Illinois
  153. East Orange, New Jersey
  154. East Palo Alto, California
  155. East Point, Georgia
  156. East St. Louis, Illinois
  157. Eden, North Carolina
  158. El Cajon, California
  159. El Paso, Texas
  160. El Portal, Florida
  161. El Toritos, California
  162. Elizabeth City, North Carolina
  163. Elmhurst, Illinois
  164. Elon, North Carolina
  165. Encinitas, California
  166. Enterprise, Alabama
  167. Escondido, California
  168. Euclid, Ohio
  169. Evanston, Illinois
  170. Fairburn, Georgia
  171. Fairfax, South Carolina
  172. Fairfield Park, Ohio
  173. Fallbrook, California
  174. Fayetteville, North Carolina
  175. Florence County, South Carolina
  176. Florida City, Florida
  177. Fontana, California
  178. Forest City, North Carolina
  179. Forest Home, Alabama
  180. Forest Park, Georgia
  181. Forest Park, Illinois
  182. Fort Dale Alabama
  183. Fort Lauderdale, Florida
  184. Freeport, New York
  185. Fuquay-Varina, North Carolina
  186. Galveston, Texas
  187. Garfield Heights, Ohio
  188. Garland, Alabama
  189. Garner, North Carolina
  190. Gary, Indiana
  191. Gastonia, North Carolina
  192. Geneva, Alabama
  193. Georgiana, Alabama
  194. Glasgow, Alabama
  195. Glenwood, Illinois
  196. Golden Beach, Florida
  197. Goldsboro, North Carolina
  198. Grace, Alabama
  199. Graham, North Carolina
  200. Grand Terrace, California
  201. Greensboro, North Carolina
  202. Greensville, North Carolina
  203. Greenville, Alabama
  204. Gulfport, Florida
  205. Hackensack, New Jersey
  206. Hallandale Beach, Florida
  207. Halso Mill, Alabama
  208. Hamlet, North Carolina
  209. Harnett County, North Carolina
  210. Hartford, Connecticut
  211. Harvey, Illinois
  212. Havelock, North Carolina
  213. Hawthorne, California
  214. Haynesville, Illinois
  215. Hazel Crest, Illinois
  216. Hemet, California
  217. Hempstead, New York
  218. Henderson, North Carolina
  219. Hendersonville, North Carolina
  220. Hesperia, California
  221. Hialeah, Florida
  222. Hickory, North Carolina
  223. High Point, North Carolina
  224. Highland, California
  225. Hileah Gardens, Florida
  226. Hillsboro Beach, Florida
  227. Hillsborough, North Carolina
  228. Hillside, Illinois
  229. Hoke County, North Carolina
  230. Holbrook, Illinois
  231. Holly Springs, North Carolina
  232. Hollywood, California
  233. Hollywood, Florida
  234. Homestead, Florida
  235. Hope Mills, North Carolina
  236. Horry County, South Carolina
  237. Houston, Texas
  238. Huntersville, North Carolina
  239. Indian Creek Village, Florida
  240. Indian Rocks Beach, Florida
  241. Indian Shores, Florida
  242. Indian Trail, North Carolina
  243. Indian Wells, California
  244. Indianapolis, Indiana
  245. Indio, California
  246. Industry, Alabama
  247. Inglewood, California
  248. Inland Empire, California
  249. Iowa City, Iowa
  250. Iredell County, North Carolina
  251. Irvington, New Jersey
  252. Islandia, Florida
  253. Jackson, Mississippi
  254. Jackson, Tennessee
  255. Jamestown, New York
  256. Jersey City, New Jersey
  257. Joliet, Illinois
  258. Joshua Tree, California
  259. Kalamazoo, Michigan
  260. Kannapolis, North Carolina
  261. Kansas City, Missouri
  262. Kenneth City, Florida
  263. Kernersville, North Carolina
  264. Key Biscayne, Florida
  265. Kigali, Rwanda
  266. Kings Mountain, North Carolina
  267. Kingston, North Carolina
  268. Knightdale, North Carolina
  269. KwaZulu Natal Province, South Africa
  270. La Jolla, California
  271. La Mesa, California
  272. La Quinta, California
  273. Ladera, California
  274. Lafayette, Louisiana
  275. Lake Arrowhead, California
  276. Lake Elsinore, California
  277. Lakeland, Florida
  278. Lakeside, California
  279. Lakewood, Ohio
  280. LaPorte, Indiana
  281. Largo, Florida
  282. Lauderdale Lakes, Florida
  283. Lauderdale-By-The Sea, Florida
  284. Lauderhill, Florida
  285. Laurinburg, North Carolina
  286. Lazy Lake, Florida
  287. Lee County, North Carolina
  288. Lemon Grove, California
  289. Lenoir, North Carolina
  290. Levy County, Florida
  291. Lexington, North Carolina
  292. Liberty, Alabama
  293. Lighthouse Point, Florida
  294. Lincoln, Nebraska
  295. Lincolnton, North Carolina
  296. Linndale, Ohio
  297. Loma Linda, California
  298. Long Island, New York
  299. Los Angeles, California
  300. Lucerne Valley, California
  301. Lumberton, North Carolina
  302. Lynwood, Illinois
  303. Madeira Beach, Florida
  304. Madison, Wisconsin
  305. Manningham, Alabama
  306. Maple Heights, Ohio
  307. Margate, Florida
  308. Marina Del Rey, California
  309. Marion County, South Carolina
  310. Markham, Illinois
  311. Marlboro County, South Carolina
  312. Mashville, Alabama
  313. Matthews, North Carolina
  314. Maywood, Illinois
  315. McKenzie, Alabama
  316. Meldey, Florida
  317. Melrose Park, Illinois
  318. Mentone, California
  319. Miami Beach, Florida
  320. Miami Gardens, Florida
  321. Miami Shores, Florida
  322. Miami Springs, Florida
  323. Miami, Florida
  324. Miami/Dade County, Florida
  325. Michigan City, Indiana
  326. Middletown, New York
  327. Midlothian, Illinois
  328. Midway, Alabama
  329. Milan, Illinois
  330. Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  331. Minneapolis, Minnesota
  332. Mint Hill, North Carolina
  333. Miramar, Florida
  334. Moline, Illinois
  335. Monroe, Louisiana
  336. Monroe, North Carolina
  337. Montclair, California
  338. Monterey, Alabama
  339. Montgomery County, North Carolina
  340. Montgomery, Alabama
  341. Moore County, North Carolina
  342. Mooresville, North Carolina
  343. Morehead City, North Carolina
  344. Moreno Valley, California
  345. Morganton, North Carolina
  346. Morrisville, North Carolina
  347. Mount Airy, North Carolina
  348. Mount Holly, North Carolina
  349. Mount Moriah, Alabama
  350. Mount Olive, Alabama
  351. Mount Vernon, New York
  352. Murrieta, California
  353. Muskogee, Oklahoma
  354. Nashville, Tennessee
  355. Needles, California
  356. New Bern, North Carolina
  357. New Orleans, Louisiana
  358. New Rochelle, New York
  359. New York City–Bronx, New York
  360. New York City–Brooklyn, New York
  361. New York City–Harlem, New York
  362. New York City–Manhattan, New York
  363. New York City–Queens, New York
  364. New York City–Staten Island, New York
  365. Newark, Delaware
  366. Newark, New Jersey
  367. Newburg, New York
  368. Newburgh Heights, Ohio
  369. Newton, North Carolina
  370. Nickerson Garden, California
  371. Nora, Illinois
  372. Norco, California
  373. Norristown, Pennsylvania
  374. North Bay Village, Florida
  375. North Lake, Illinois
  376. North Lauderdale, Florida
  377. North Miami Beach, Florida
  378. North Miami, Florida
  379. North Redington Beach, Florida
  380. Northlake, Illinois
  381. Oak Island, North Carolina
  382. Oak Park, Illinois
  383. Oakland Bay, California
  384. Oakland Park, Florida
  385. Oakland, California
  386. Oaky Streak, Alabama
  387. Oceanside, California
  388. Odom Crossroads, Alabama
  389. Oldsmar, Florida
  390. Olympia Fields, Illinois
  391. Omaha, Nebraska
  392. Ontario, California
  393. Opa-Locka, Florida
  394. Orange, New Jersey
  395. Oxford, North Carolina
  396. Ozark, Alabama
  397. Ozona, Florida
  398. Pacific Beach, California
  399. Pala, California
  400. Palm Desert, California
  401. Palm Harbor, Florida
  402. Palm River County, Florida
  403. Palm Springs, California
  404. Palmdale, California
  405. Palmetto, Georgia
  406. Panama City, Florida
  407. Parkland, Florida
  408. Parma Heights, Ohio
  409. Parma, Ohio
  410. Pasco County, Florida
  411. Pass-A-Grille Beach, Florida
  412. Pembroke Park, Florida
  413. Pembroke Pines, Florida
  414. Peoria, Illinois
  415. Perris, California
  416. Phenix City, Alabama
  417. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  418. Phoenix, Illinois
  419. Pigeon Creek, Alabama
  420. Pinecrest, Florida
  421. Pinehurst, North Carolina
  422. Pinellas County, Florida
  423. Pinellas Park, Florida
  424. Pittsburg, California
  425. Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
  426. Plant City County, Florida
  427. Plantation, Florida
  428. Polk County, Florida
  429. Pompano Beach, Florida
  430. Portland, Oregon
  431. Posen, Illinois
  432. Poughkeepsie, New York
  433. Poway, California
  434. Providence, Alabama
  435. Raleigh, North Carolina
  436. Ramona, California
  437. Ranchita, California
  438. Rancho Bernardo, California
  439. Rancho Cucamonga, California
  440. Rancho Mirage, California
  441. Rancho Santa Fe, California
  442. Reddock Springs, Alabama
  443. Redington Beach, Florida
  444. Redington Shores, Florida
  445. Redlands, California
  446. Reidsville, North Carolina
  447. Rhodes, Alabama
  448. Rialto, California
  449. Richmond County, North Carolina
  450. Richmond, Virginia
  451. Ridgeville, Alabama
  452. Riverdale, Illinois
  453. Riverside County, California
  454. Riverside, California
  455. Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina
  456. Robbins, Illinois
  457. Robeson County, North Carolina
  458. Rochester, New York
  459. Rocky Mount, North Carolina
  460. Round Lake Beach, Illinois
  461. Round Lake Heights, Illinois
  462. Round Lake Park, Illinois
  463. Round Lake, Illinois
  464. Roxboro, North Carolina
  465. Running Springs, California
  466. Sacramento, California
  467. Safety Harbor, Florida
  468. Salisbury, North Carolina
  469. Salter, Alabama
  470. San Bernardino County, California
  471. San Bernardino, California
  472. San Diego, California
  473. San Francisco, California
  474. San Jacinto, California
  475. San Luis Rey, California
  476. San Marcos, California
  477. San Ysidro, California
  478. Sand Cut, Alabama
  479. Sanford, North Carolina
  480. Santa Monica, California
  481. Santa Ysabel, California
  482. Santee, California
  483. Sardia, Alabama
  484. Saucer, Alabama
  485. Sauk Village, Illinois
  486. Savannah, Georgia
  487. Schenectady, New York
  488. Scotland County, North Carolina
  489. Sea Ranch Lakes, Florida
  490. Searcy, Alabama
  491. Seffner, Florida
  492. Selma, North Carolina
  493. Seminole, Florida
  494. Shacklesville, Alabama
  495. Shaker Heights, Ohio
  496. Shelby, North Carolina
  497. Shell, Alabama
  498. Siler City, North Carolina
  499. Silvis, Illinois
  500. Skokie, Illinois
  501. Smithfield, North Carolina
  502. Solana Beach, California
  503. South Euclid, Ohio
  504. South Holland, Illinois
  505. South Miami, Florida
  506. South Pasadena, Florida
  507. Southern Pines, North Carolina
  508. Southwest Ranches, Florida
  509. Spring Hill, Alabama
  510. Spring Lake, North Carolina
  511. Spring Valley, California
  512. Springfield, Illinois
  513. Springfield, Missouri
  514. St. Louis, Missouri
  515. St. Peter Beach, Florida
  516. Stanley County, North Carolina
  517. Starlington, Alabama
  518. Statesville, North Carolina
  519. Stone Mountain, Georgia
  520. Stone Park, Illinois
  521. Subter County, South Carolina
  522. Summerfield, North Carolina
  523. Sunny Isles Beach, Florida
  524. Sunrise, Florida
  525. Sunset Beach, Florida
  526. Surfside, Florida
  527. Sweetwater Florida
  528. Syracuse, New York
  529. Tamarac, Florida
  530. Tampa Bay, Florida
  531. Tarboro, North Carolina
  532. Tarpon Springs, Florida
  533. Tecate, California
  534. Temecula, California
  535. Tierra Verde, Florida
  536. Toronto, Canada
  537. Torrance, California
  538. Treasure Island, Florida
  539. Trinity, North Carolina
  540. Troy, New York
  541. Tulsa, Oklahoma
  542. Twentynine Palms, California
  543. Union City, Georgia
  544. Union County, North Carolina
  545. University Heights, Ohio
  546. Upland, California
  547. Valley Stream, New York
  548. Venice, California
  549. Vicksburg, Mississippi
  550. Victorville, California
  551. Virginia Gardens, Florida
  552. Vista, California
  553. Wadesboro, North Carolina
  554. Wadsworth, Illinois
  555. Wake Forest, North Carolina
  556. Wald, Alabama
  557. Warren, Illinois
  558. Warrensville Heights, Ohio
  559. Washington, D.C.
  560. Washington, North Carolina
  561. Watts, California
  562. Waynesville, North Carolina
  563. Weddington, North Carolina
  564. West Miami, Florida
  565. West Park, Florida
  566. Westbury, New York
  567. Westchester, Illinois
  568. Westchester, Illinois
  569. Westchester, New York
  570. Weston, Florida
  571. White Plains, New York
  572. Whiteville, North Carolina
  573. Wildomar, California
  574. Williston, Florida
  575. Wilmington, Delaware
  576. Wilmington, North Carolina
  577. Wilson, North Carolina
  578. Wilton Manors, Florida
  579. Windsor Canada
  580. Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  581. Wrightwood, California
  582. Yermo, California
  583. Yonkers, New York
  584. Yucaipa, California
  585. Yucca Valley, California
Please call 773.285.9600 to register your city today.  The 2010 Million Father March is managed by The Black Star Project, U.S.A. and sponsored by the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

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