Will Mayor Emanuel decide to oppose minimum wage increases after watching tonight’s suburban episode of Public Affairs, on web and cable?

With such a smart city, wouldn’t you think the Mayor would charge his working group with deciding if the “Science” suggests we would benefit our city as a whole by raising, lowering or keeping the minimum wage the same?

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Tonight’s suburban episode of Public Affairs, featuring Economics Professor Allen  Sanderson,  focuses on the impact of minimum wages increases on unemployment and on the efficacy of school choice, theory and evidence. [See, below, for the airing schedule for tonight’s show].

You can also watch the Sanderson show 24/7 at the Public Affairs youtube channel.

To set the scene for tonight’s show, you should know that last month, Mayor Emanuel announced a “Working Group,” to recommend a plan to increase the minimum wage in Chicago. This is the Chicago way.

Rahm runs around the country telling people what a “smart” city we have, with a premier research university, the University of Chicago, on its south side and another premier research university, Northwestern University just to the north of the City in Evanston. These research universities are part of Rahm’s plan to tout Chicago as a smart city, friendly to high tech firms and high tech individuals.

With such a smart city, wouldn’t you think the Mayor would charge his working group with deciding if the “Science” suggests we would benefit our city as a whole by raising, lowering or keeping the minimum wage the same? Nope, the Mayor, who majored in dance at Sarah Lawrence, has decided already that the minimum wage in Chicago should be increased.  The working  group just has to decide by how much.

Economists at the University of Chicago and Northwestern University spend a good deal of their careers developing the skills to help society determine if minimum wages increases are good or bad.  Did Rahm put even one economist from any university on his working group? Not a one.  So much for Rahm and science.

Okay, Mayor Emanuel, would you like to learn from an economist at the University of Chicago, Professor Allen Sanderson, if a minimum wage increase would be good, bad, or indifferent for Chicago? You would? Great.

Mayor, just watch tonight’s Chicago Metro Suburban episode of Public Affairs. If you live in the City, you can’t watch it tonight on cable (you could have watched it  last night).

But, Mayor, you are in luck, you can watch the Sanderson show 24/7 at the Public Affairs youtube channel.

Mayor, please watch the show and come on Public Affairs next week to discuss these topics with show host Jeff Berkowitz:  Education and employment,  I think you will  want to get those issues right.

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Tonight’s Chicago metro edition of “Public Affairs with Jeff Berkowitz” focuses on the impact of raising the minimum wage and on school choice

The Public Affairs show airs at 8:30 pm in the below listed 24 North and Northwest Chicago Metro suburbs on the indicated channels:

Comcast Cable Ch. 19 in Buffalo Grove, Elk Grove Village, Hoffman Estates, parts of Inverness, Lincolnwood, Morton Grove, Niles, Northfield, Palatine, Rolling Meadows and Wilmette.

and on

Comcast Cable Ch. 35 in Arlington Heights, Bartlett, Glenview, Golf, Des Plaines, Hanover Park, Mt. Prospect, Northbrook, Park Ridge, Prospect Heights, Schaumburg, Skokie, Streamwood and Wheeling.

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Allen Sanderson: ...The Congressional Budget Office... estimate was 500,000 jobs would be lost [with an increase in the minimum wage to $10.10/hr.]

You can also watch the Sanderson show 24/7 at the Public Affairs youtube channel.

Tonight’s show features Professor Sanderson debating and discussing with show host Jeff Berkowitz  the impact of raising the Illinois and/or the federal minimum wage on unemployment (and in particular on minority unemployment), who is likely to gain or lose as a result of an increase in the minimum wage; is there such a thing as a free lunch; and is the minimum wage discussion likely to be important in the 2014 Fall, Illinois Gubernatorial election and in the 2014 national, mid-term hotly contested U. S. Senate races

Sanderson and Berkowitz also discuss the impact of giving low income parents more control over their kids’ education through school vouchers-school choice, charter schools and home schooling; and which groups and individuals strongly oppose empowering low income parents by giving parents a choice as to which schools their kids should attend.

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Jeff Berkowitz: Allen Sanderson, minimum wages, good or bad?

Allen Sanderson:  [UChicago economist]: I think on average, bad. There are some small benefits, but they are very small compared to the costs and disruption of the economy.

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Jeff Berkowitz:  So, people are getting 40% more [with a $10.10 /hr. minimum wage] if they work the same number of hours, and then [Obama/Biden adviser Jared Bernstein] says that increase in the minimum wage will cause a zero increase in unemployment, can he be wrong?

Allen Sanderson: ...He is wrong. The Congressional Budget Office, the CBO, estimate was 500,000 jobs would be lost [with an increase in the minimum wage to $10.10/hr.  and the CBO estimate said the possible job loss could be as much as one million jobs]... There is not another credible estimate on the table, other than that [500,000 job loss] estimate.

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Allen Sanderson: I wish [Bruce Rauner] had stuck with his position [that Illinois should lower, not raise, its minimum wage] because he was absolutely right.   Look, Illinois has a very high unemployment rate, Chicago has a very high unemployment rate—it’s complicated as to why: it’s in part because of unions [raising the wage above the market wage]; it’s in part because of the demographics, the education, minority populations just have higher unemployment rates, but the minimum wage is not insignificant in the fact that Illinois has a higher unemployment rate

Jeff Berkowitz: So, Illinois has a higher minimum wage, $8.25, as opposed to the federal [$7.25] and also a much higher unemployment rate than the average across the country, and you’re saying —

Allen Sanderson: Those two items [the higher minimum wage and higher unemployment rate in Illinois] are not unrelated.

Jeff Berkowitz: Part of that higher level of unemployment in Illinois is related to the fact that Illinois has a higher minimum wage than the federal minimum wage and in Chicago, there may be work conditions and a variety of regulatory factors that may make it more costly for business to come in to the City and employ people, that contributes to the higher unemployment rate in Chicago?

Allen Sanderson: Yes...

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