Tundra or Tumbleweed? This Beautiful Husky Mix Needs Roots and Fast!

Tundra or Tumbleweed? This Beautiful Husky Mix Needs Roots and Fast!
Tundra is a 4 1/2 y.o. husky/shep mix up for adoption at PACT Humane in Bloomingdale, IL

UPDATE 1/1/16: Tundra was PACT's first adoption of the year!  YAY!  THANK YOU for all your shares. He's a great dog!

I had the pleasure of fostering this stunning young boy over the holiday when PACT Humane Society in Bloomingdale, IL received him as a returned adoption just before Christmas Eve. Because PACT is located in Petco, no dogs could be onsite for Christmas as the store is locked up. That gave PACT volunteers only hours to secure a foster placement for him. Within an hour of hearing of him, he was at my home. I only had him for 48 hours (my only window to help between pet sitting gigs here), but that was long enough to become a real fan and to have my heart go out to him in a plight that just seems to worsen by the day.

I met him for the first time as he was walking into my house so I'll give you all the info I can and if you need more, or can step in to help, you can call the folks at PACT directly at 630-375-7017 or message them through their Facebook page. And if you can't help, I do hope you will consider sharing because he is truly in a predicament.

Tundra calmly oversees kitchen activities. No begging or counter surfing. Not big on treats (although roast beef is pretty good, he said).

Tundra calmly oversees kitchen activities. No begging or counter surfing. Not big on treats (although roast beef is pretty good, he said).

Tundra is a 4 1/2 y.o. husky/shepherd mix, smallish (I'd guess 45# or so). He was found as a stray in downstate Illinois, entering the shelter system in October 2013.  He was adopted but later returned to that shelter in September 2015 (don't know why). PACT then pulled him for rescue (i.e. got him out of the shelter where he was at risk for euthanasia, placing him in a foster home).  He was in foster for a month and I understand he did well with the resident dogs. He does have separation anxiety and cannot tolerate being crated (which is why Petco cannot house him onsite) but was able to free roam the house and apparently did well with the other resident dogs there. Unfortunately the foster leaves for the winter and could no longer keep him. This is where things really start to break down for him.

Tundra does value closeness.

Tundra does value closeness.

Tundra was adopted but apparently they tried to contain him in one area of the house and he didn't tolerate that well (I heard he jumped a gate but not sure of exact details). All I know for certain is the family was going to be gone for the holiday and felt the separation anxiety (SA) was more than they could handle and he was returned. That's when he came to me.

At my house, he was a GEM. A bit of a clingy gem but still, high marks. I have no other pets and he was not alone so I can't speak to the SA, but here is what I can tell you about my 48 hours with him in that context.  A VERY brief period of baying (maybe a minute or two) when he first came in but he'd never met me before so of course he would be anxious. However, he settled in amazingly fast.

It wasn't long before Tundra had settled in, content to lay by the fire.

It wasn't long before Tundra had settled in, content to lay by the fire.

No baying or barking the rest of the time here. Excellent on the leash. Didn't seem to have a significant prey drive, not prone to pulling, not reactive when seeing other dogs.

To  help him work off his initial anxiety when he first got to my house, he got a nice walk. Great leash skills!

To help him work off his initial anxiety when he first got to my house, he got a nice walk. Great leash skills! I always double leash for safety.

Not one accident in the house. No marking. Not up on furniture (until he wanted to snuggle more on day two). No begging. Laid under the table while we ate. Slept through the night like a baby. In a word, a perfect gentleman in the house.

Tundra seems to be particularly partial to men.

Tundra seems to be particularly partial to men.

Tundra did have a tendency to stick very close, particularly with my husband. He was very calm with brief bursts of play. He can get a bit rambunctious with play so might be best suited to a home with no young kids.

He had a meet and greet with a potential adopter that went very well but the landlord would not give permission. He met their toddler and infant and was very good with them and quite unfazed by the little girl dancing around (but again, his exuberant play is a concern with kids that aren't sturdy). He was very drawn to the dad, eager to do some male bonding. After they left, Tundra was a bit amped up for a while, because he wanted to play with the young man who might have been his dad. I took him for a 20 minutue walk to work off the energy burst and he was a little rowdy but fell asleep right after and was his normal chill self and perfect on every other walk we did from that point on. Here's a great example of his play with a toy on Christmas:

Luckily another foster stepped up to take him just as his time here was coming to a necessary end. He got excited to see new people and again had a burst of "Let's have a party!" energy but when we all sat down he calmed down just fine. He seems to really respond to the ambient energy. If everyone is chilling out, he chills out. If the energy amps up with guests and such, he rises to the occasion and will need some outlet for that but a few minutes of energetic play and he's happy.

The second day at my house, Tundra was all about the snuggle, but was happy to go for a nice walk in if anyone were to suggest it.

The second day at my house, Tundra was all about the snuggle, but was happy to go for a nice walk in if anyone were to suggest it.

NOW FOR THE REASON WE NEED YOUR HELP

Unfortunately, the current foster set up is also short-term so Tundra's got to find yet ANOTHER home (foster or adoptive).  He truly cannot handle Petco.

PACT has to find Tundra a place to land by Wednesday, December 30 and the more stable the better.

At the foster, he is doing well with the resident dogs and after a stressful first night (again, understandable after leaving my house where he had been peacefully napping, to drive an hour with strangers to a house full of people, dogs and cats and not understanding one bit of this), he again is a mix of calm and playful. Snuggly and willing to bond. The report I have on cats is that he chases them around at first but ultimately settles down and is fine with them. (PACT can answer all questions for interested fosters or adopters.)

I don't know what to say about his separation anxiety, but we do know that bouncing around to this many homes would wear on ANY dog. PACT just can't seem to get ahead of the curve with a placement but a series of bandaid fixes like this, while maybe the best option in the immediate term, is not doing him any favors.

Can you be a part of the effort to help this beautiful creature a place to land? That number again: PACT 630-375-7017 THANK YOU!

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