Posts tagged "Historic Landmark"

Loving the Sears Tower in Photographs

<a href="http://www.chicagoparkdistrict.com/about-us/history/">Urbs in Horto</a>
Truth be told, when visitors come to town I take them to the top of the John Hancock rather than the Sears Tower (I know, Willis Tower… ). I like the view better from The Hancock. I love that you can see up and down the lakefront. I love that it’s in an older part... Read more »

What, me worry? In search of a more perfect union at Democracy’s crossroads in Wisconsin

What, me worry? In search of a more perfect union at Democracy’s crossroads in Wisconsin
Throughout the hideousness that was this recent ‘election cycle’, I would often meditate on the presence of a charming little building out in the middle of what almost could seem like nowhere, deep in the Wisconsin driftless. Thinking about it kept me sane. Wisconsin’s first capitol in Belmont. I visited the site in February of... Read more »

Gilded Age Glitter at The Glessner House Wins Landmarks Illinois’ Richard H. Driehaus President’s Award for Stewardship

Gilded Age Glitter at The Glessner House Wins Landmarks Illinois’ Richard H. Driehaus President’s Award for Stewardship
Swing open the massive door at 1800 Prairie Avenue, and step into the Gilded Age. This is the Glessner House. Designed by preeminent American architect H.H. Richardson just before his death in 1886, it is a masterpiece of urban residential design, and enormously influential in American architecture. Now, as a Museum, the Glessner House has... Read more »
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Reduce Reuse Recycle. The National Public Housing Museum gets some light from the Chicago Architecture Biennial

Reduce Reuse Recycle. The National Public Housing Museum gets some light from the Chicago Architecture Biennial
Part of what’s great about the Chicago Architecture Biennial is that on-going projects get fresh energy and new attention. An example of this is the project to create a National Public Housing Museum in the last remaining building of the former Jane Addams Public Housing project on Chicago’s west side. The Jane Addams Homes opened... Read more »

The Chicago Architecture Biennial is coming. Sign up for it.

The Chicago Architecture Biennial is coming. Sign up for it.
October 3rd marks the beginning of the first ever Chicago Architecture Biennial. The State of the Art of Architecture, starts in October and runs for three months, concluding on January 3, 2016. As with all good things, there are ways you can get in on the action starting now. The Frank Lloyd Wright Trust, a... Read more »

Chicago Cultural Center: BYO Flashlight Tour with Cultural Historian, Tim Samuelson

Chicago Cultural Center: BYO Flashlight Tour with Cultural Historian, Tim Samuelson
For Chicago Cultural Center’s late-night building tour with Chicago Cultural Historian Tim Samuelson, participants were reminded to BYO Flashlight, and arrive promptly at 10:30 PM. The night concluded around 1AM with a screening of the wonderful “Lost Buildings”, an animated film by Chris Ware; an inspired excursion through Samuelson’s early love of buildings and his... Read more »
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Over the River and Through the Wood: Thanksgiving, Pilgrimage and Gratitude

Over the River and Through the Wood: Thanksgiving, Pilgrimage and Gratitude
As I make my Thanksgiving trek – over the river and through the wood (such as it is), I’m thinking about pilgrimage and gratitude. I think about the idealism of that song, the aspirations we hold in our hearts as we plan our gatherings. And I think about courage in the face of adversity. Thanksgiving,... Read more »

Visiting Paradise: Reflections on a Place and its Name

The 1915 Inn at Paradise, Washington. According to a National Historic Architecture study, this Inn, like Yellowstone's Old Faithful Inn and others, were experiments in architectural design. Local natural materials were used, with the goal of blending hotel architecture with the grandiose wilderness setting. 
(Photo credit: Library of Congress, Prints &amp; Photographs Division, WA-223-1)
What’s in a place name, and how frequently does it actually relate to the place? Sometimes geographers look at place names to learn something about a region’s topography. For example, in southwest Wisconsin’s driftless area, you come across names like “coulee” and “hollow” a lot more frequently than in other parts of the state. My... Read more »

Resolutions and Best of the Year lists: Twelve Best Places of 2012

Door County’s as good a place as any to start an adventure by land and by sea.
Joining the spate of year-end round-ups; I thought I’d offer my list of 12 favorite and fantastic places I had the joy of being in at some point during this passing year. Below are images I made at each one along the way. Some of these places I’ve written about and some I plan —... Read more »
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Photographs, Violence and Place: Christmas Lessons for Change Following the Newtown Tragedy

Bandit's Roost (1888) by Jacob Riis, from "How the Other Half Lives". This image is Bandit's Roost at 59½ Mulberry Street, considered the most crime-ridden, dangerous part of New York City.

Riis’ book "How the Other Half Lives" was first published as an article in the 1889 Christmas issue of Scribner's Magazine.
Since the shootings at Sandy Hook elementary in Newtown, CT, I’ve been thinking about photographers who focus on social change in efforts to end suffering and injustice. Since early in its history, photography has intersected with the idea that giving view to tragedy can help prevent it. Photographs can offer evidence – a look into... Read more »