I Hate Bikers

I don't like bikers.

Bikers are inherently dangerous and crazed.

Training doesn't work.

Only insane people ride bikes, why would anyone sane put themselves at that much risk?

Not on my watch, we will discourage motorcycle riders and suggest they stop riding.

A motorcycle KILLED my brother.

Scene II

 The US Army fielded the Army Traffic Safety Training Program (ATSTP) in April 2006, and since then ATSTP has morphed and grown into a full frontal assault against private motor vehicle, and motorcycle mishaps. Within the first year, the raw numbers in motorcycle mishaps declined significantly. I won't bore you with the numbers, but if there is a demand I will post the results from previous years. The important thing is that there was a reduction, and unfortunately empirical data was not collected service wide. So we are left wondering what exactly caused the change.

 

One of the Army changes included the adoption of Motorcycle Refresher Training (MRT), and the early results showed promise. The first MRT effort occurred on March 2008 at Fort Stewart, Georgia Third Infantry Division (3ID). The Division was starting to redeploy from combat and the Garrison Safety Officer Jimmy McCullough was tasked with stopping any fatalities from occurring during post deployment leave (vacation for us civilians). Third ID had been plagued by a high number of motorcycle fatalities during the previous redeployment, and the commanding general ordered Jimmy McCullough to guarantee that no returning soldier shall die on a motorcycle. The motorcycle riding season of 2008 saw an increase in motorcycle sales and fatalities, fortunately none of the redeployed Fort Stewart Soldier were part of the fatalities. Jimmy McCullough and his team of safety professional pulled off what many thought would be impossible--stop fatalities without prohibiting motorcycle riding. In this success story, the empirical data was collected. Fort Stewart had collected and tracked every soldier who completed MRT and the results are positive. To date over 1000 soldiers on Fort Stewart completed MRT and only four soldiers had experienced a mishap since the first session in March 2008! All four mishaps were treated and released, and three of the mishaps were caused by the car driver failing to yield to the motorcyclist right of way. This is very good news indeed.

 

As with any study or policy change, one must have a measurable performance and one must be able to replicate the results. Fort Hood has been using MRT, too, and the results are similar. The next test happens upon 3ID redeployment from theatre again, and a new round of MRT sessions are tracked and recorded. Many suspect similar, if not identical, results from the second study. No motorcycle fatalities is a good thing--has the Army found its magic bullet?

Filed under: motorcycle accidents

Tags: @lifefront

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  • I'm very sorry about your brother. You can judge certain actions by motorcyclists but you cannot generalize everyone on motorcycles. I don't want to get into specific examples to create a frenzy of going back and forth and picking single points to argue on. If you feel that passionately about it, you should turn it into something positive rather than hate. How can you turn it into something positive? Educate motorcyclists, educate drivers, raise awareness, pass legislation related to motorcycle riding such as helmet laws, health insurance requirements and so on and so forth. For example, IL doesn't have helmet requirement but when someone crashes, tax payers most likely pay for a helicopter to fly out, while police and ambulance are on the scene, do major procedures with astronomical costs to keep the rider alive, all for what? Because a rider is stupid enough to think feeling the wind is worth that cost to himself/herself and the public. People seek different things for a thrill and accidents happen and there are as many ways to live life as there are people in this world. If you're unfrotunate enough to have been affected by the negative side of certain activity, then you should find the strength and courage to do something postivie and reduce the chances of that happening again without creating more hate and bitterness. I think we have enough hate in our society and world in general. Hope you take all of this in as positive and don't get offended by any of it because it's not meant to be read that way. May your brother rest in peace.....

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