If 'downstairs,' why not 'downelevator,' too?

If 'downstairs,' why not 'downelevator,' too?
source: reusableart.com

There are two ways for me to go to the lower levels of my building when I'm in my apartment. As you might guess, they are the elevator and the stairs. Their doors are not far apart, but there are plenty of other buildings I've seen where elevators are a greater distance from the stairs. It struck me that a new word was in order.

So when I was leaving a message for a friend this morning, I told her I needed to go "downelevator" to get something. I wanted to be honest. Usage suggested I was going "downstairs," but I wasn't going to take the stairs to do it.

I'd never heard the word before, so I think it's mine -- until now. It's clear and it's honest -- if you're telling someone you're coming down, you will be reporting how quickly and where you'll arrive and how tired you'll be when you get there. Going downelevator, of course, is not as tiring as going downstairs.

My British and Commonwealth readers and cousins would call it "downlift," I suppose -- but if that sounds odd to you, consider the root of "elevator." Elevating something down doesn't sound any worse than lifting it down.

Try the word -- and feel free to comment about results!

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  • What's the word for when someone in the upstairs apartment installs and uses an Acorn chair on the stairs in the common area?

    The last paragraph reminds me that Windows at least had the Start button, but basically nothing on that menu has anything to do with start other than "Restart," and still it shuts down before it restarts.

  • In reply to jack:

    When it's a stairlift like an Acorn, Jack, I'd say the word is "necessary."

  • "Downelevator" works, so now all you have to do is campaign others to make it standard. I have difficulty even coming up with a verb to describe ending a telephone conversation. We once said we would "hang up," but when we are using cell phones or cordless ones, this no long describes what we are doing. I have seen writers use words such as "sign off" or "disconnect," but they don't seem right. It is easy enough to replace "dialed" by simply saying we "called" someone, but what do we say when we say goodbye.

  • In reply to jnorto:

    Thank you, jnorto. The point about a successor to "hang up" is a very good one. I keep thinking of that old Christmassy song (not exactly a carol), "Let it Snow" -- "The fire is slowly dying/and my dear, we're still goodbying." How about it -- goodbying?

  • In reply to Margaret H. Laing:

    Works for me, but I am not sure it will catch on.

  • In reply to jnorto:

    OK, but we can try!

  • In reply to jnorto:

    "Hit the red button?"

    I noted before that it made no sense that wireless companies were advertising "4 lines for $---."

  • In reply to jack:

    Well, thanks, Jack. I guess "lines" don't have to be "cords" anymore.

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