Enough NATO: Want to learn how to pick a pineapple? Then Make a pina-cocktail.

Enough NATO: Want to learn how to pick a pineapple? Then Make a pina-cocktail.

NATO, protesters, police coverage, bad behavior, street closures, yes good for the city, no bad for the city.

Hey, it is a beautiful day today in Chicago.  Cubs are playing the White Sox.  My kid learned to ride his bike today with no training wheels, no Band-Aids have been pulled out yet and I am in the mood for pineapple cocktails.  So I am wondering, do you know how to pick a perfectly ripe pineapple?  So let' take a break from talkin' NATO and talk pineapples.

Pineapples seem to mislead people. You want to make sure you grab a fresh pineapple, not one that is rotting inside already.  I remember when my husband and I went to Hawaii we asked everyone their strategy for picking a good pineapple.

The most common pieces of advise :

1.  Color: Do not buy a pineapple that is still green.  You want one that is yellow from base to stem which means it will be the sweetest.

2.  Smell:  Smell the one you are going to buy.  It should smell sweet.  If there is no smell, then it probably isn't ripe.  If it smells fermented, then it is overripe.

3. Touch:  When you press your fingers into the pineapple, it should still be firm, but not like a rock. If is it squishy, it is overripe.

MYTHS:

1.  Pulling a leaf from the top proves ripeness. FALSE,  If they come out is it probably rotten.

2.  Pineapples will ripen off the tree.  - FALSE they do not ripen once picked.

Interesting Facts About Pineapples

1.  They been in the Americas for over 1000 years.

2.  They were used to prevent scurvy because of their vitamin C in the old days.

3.  When pineapple are canned the color changes to a brighter yellow.  Rarely is fresh cut as yellow as canned.

3 Best Pineapple Cocktails:

Mexican Style

1.  My first and foremost is the Pineapple Margarita.  Not  blended with ice, but shaken and then served over ice.

American Style

2.  Pineapples blended, then mixed with orange juice, ginger ale and vodka.

Spanish Style

3.  Sounds strange, but White Sangria with pineapples and oranges chopped in it.  I let it sit in the frig for a little bit.  To make it a little more refreshing I use a little Le Croix when I serve it in a glass.

Comments

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  • Is there a way of picking one that is not mostly core (other than one the store has cut in half and wrapped in plastic)?

    Can the core be juiced or have some other use?

  • In reply to jack:

    Keep the core. Either freeze it whole or chop up into pieces and freeze. Then save for a day when you are making the sangria or a orange juice. In fact, next time you have a core (freeze or keep it) and then place it in your pitcher as a flavor or element to a cocktail drink or a mixed fruit juice.

    BTW, you can suck on it with a little added sugar (SHHHH!) not that healthy- but yummy.

  • I guess that's similar to some juice bottles saying "use frozen fruit instead of ice so as not to dilute the flavor." Have to remember it next time.

    I used to be able to chew them, but not any more.

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