Graceland Cemetery: The rich famous and unknown are all equal they are all dead

Medill Famiy monument in Graceland Cemetery. The headstone on the right is Joseph Medill. Joseph Medill bought the Chicago Tribune in 1855. The Medill School of Journalism is named after him.

Medill Famiy monument in Graceland Cemetery. The headstone on the right is Joseph Medill. Joseph Medill bought the Chicago Tribune in 1855. The Medill School of Journalism is named after him.

Tombs are the clothes of the dead and a grave is a plain suit; while an expensive monument is one with embroidery. (R. Buckminster Fuller)

Worn headstone of one forgotten soul.

Worn headstone of a long forgotten soul.

Graceland Cemetery is full of tombs, graves, and monuments. It is a garden of stone. A place where death meets sculpture and architecture.

Graceland Cemetery is the final place of rest for Chicago's rich, famous, and forgotten. It is a garden of stone. Granite, marble, limestone. Many of the stones are worn. The names and dates are gone. The dead are forgotten.

There are rows upon rows of worn and fallen headstones sitting near tended tombs and monuments.

Time kills. It erodes bodies until they die. Time erodes stone until it chips and crumbles. It erases the names of the dead.

The earth starts to swallow some of the stone.

While the tombs and monuments of the famous fascinate, the worn and eroded graves pique interest. Who were these long forgotten souls?

In the Graceland Cemetery, the rich, famous, and unknown are all equal. They are all dead.

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