Delfino Mora gets justice not publicity

This is the week of justice in Chicago. Nanci Koschman, after ten years finally got justice for her son. Richard Vanecko plead guilty to involuntary manslaughter.  The media case of the decade is finally closed.

It is a good bet awards will go out, deservedly, to the tenacious reporters who stayed on this case. There may even be book and documentary deals. Again, well deserved.

Another family just got partial justice for the murder of their husband and father. Their case did not receive the ongoing publicity of the Koschman case. No tenacious reporters publicized it continually. There were no television interviews with the family by treacly fashionable empathetic reporters.

No relative of a politician was involved. No awards will be given out for courageous reporting. No book or documentary deals will be in the making.

The victim was murdered. His death was reported and that was that.

chi-delfino-mora-and-family-photo

Delfino Mora, inset, and members of the Mora family (Articles Chicago Tribune).

His name was Delfino Mora. He was 62 years old. He was married for forty years. He and his wife raised 12 children, aged 17-40.

Mr. Mora and his family lived in abject poverty in Mexico. He decided a better life lay in America. He brought his burgeoning family to Chicago. Mora worked in the construction industry until an injury left him disabled, unable to fully use one of his arms.

Mora was not one to just sit idle whiling away the hours at home. He walked the alleys collecting cans to bring in extra money for his family.

He woke up every morning, left his house, and went collecting. In the spirit of Chicago, he went to work.

Delfino Mora came to Chicago to live the American dream.

He was found lying in an alley, victim of the American nightmare.

Delfino Mora was found unconscious and bleeding. He was taken to a hospital where he eventually died. The cause of death was blunt head trauma.

Delfina Mora was one more victim of the 2012 Chicago Summer of murder and mayhem.

Mora’s story gets worse. The pitiless criminals who attacked and beat him to death made a video of their actions. Being ubiquitous trendoids, they posted the video on Facebook. A member of Mora’s family learned about it, found it, and took it to police. The predators were captured.

But there’s more. These jackals were not just bent on robbing and beating a defenseless disabled man.

This was a game. A game called “Pick ‘Em Out and Knock ‘Em Out.” The game is popular among thugs and gangs of merciless predatory youths.

They pick a victim to prey upon, preferably one who is elderly, weak, or handicapped. They attack, and viciously beat him just to knock him out. Robbery is a side-benefit.

It was reported that Mora’s head hit the concrete so hard a crack could be heard on the video.

Delfino Mora, husband, father, and hard worker, was the victim of a vicious game by vicious people.

Delfino Mora and his family finally got some justice. One of the teen predators is serving a 30 year sentence. Another just plead guilty and was sentenced to 27 years in prison. The third is still awaiting trial for the murder.

No one came out and said if they had a father, he would look like Delfino Mora. There were no national social media lynch mobs and posses spewing about the injustice of this murder. No politicians tripped over each other to get their faces on camera to decry the murder of a hard working father and husband.

No political preachers and priests raised hell fire and brimstone. There were no mass claims of "I am Delfino Mora". There were no graphics or tee shirts of a man in a cowboy hat. People did not pose with cowboy hats in solidarity with Delfino Mora. There were no mass protests.

No one turned Delfino Mora into a national symbolic hero of what is wrong in our society.

Delfino Mora was a nobody. He was treated as such. He was just another cold hard crime statistic.

A man comes here to provide a better life for his family. He works hard. When he is disabled, he wanders the alleys, collecting cans and other recyclable materials to make ends meet. To provide for his family. Then, as part of a game by thugs, he is killed.

But in Chicago, we cannot publicize roving bands of thugs attacking people. It is not appropriate. It is not politically correct. Some members of certain communities will get upset. Their tender sensitivities will be offended.

So, like the cowards our society turned into, we ignore the Delfino Mora's of the world. He was just an old garbage collector. He did not matter.

Delfino Mora did not have the advantage of being killed by a member of a famous political family. His case is not front page or headline news. There are no breathless reporters wondering who will show up for his trial.

There is only his family. Still mourning their loss.

Delfino Mora was a victim of the politicians. They hoped his case could be buried, out of sight and mind of the media and the public. Delfina Mora had the bad luck to be murdered by thugs. Thugs who our politicians and other politically correct people refuse to acknowledge exist.

It is good justice is being done. It is better the thugs are being convicted one by one.

It is bad Delfino Mora was forgotten.

He will not be remembered again until the result of the trial of the last thug. Then, he will be forgotten again.

Portions of this story were published in another media entity in 2012.

 

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    Peter V. Bella is a freelance photojournalist and writer. He covers news events, social events, and photographs anything and everything that piques his interest. Mr. Bella can be reached at pvbella@gmail.com.
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