WWDDD Part 2: Mateus and Lancers?

WWDDD Part 2: Mateus and Lancers?

Our first post about what wine Don Draper would drink created a lot of
interest on Twitter. People liked to think about what wine he would
drink, but few people had actual ideas, including us.  Considering I
wasn't born until the mid-70s, I know nothing about wine from back
then; so I turned to my parents.

My dad texts: Mateus and Lancers. To which, I reply: What?

Apparently, these were the wines people drank in the 60s and 70s--at least in the Midwest. My dad, a Mad Men
fan, says maybe Draper, as a wealthy New Yorker, was exposed to
Bordeaux, but those of "us in Milwaukee who drank wine back then
were drinking Mateus and Lancers."

So I did some research:

Mateus,
a cheap rosé from Portugal, came in a wide green bottle with a narrow neck, which my mom
claims people would use as a candlestick holder afterward.

Thumbnail image for mateus2.jpg

Photo by Josephers on Flickr

Lancers, also made in Portugal, is a similar rosé. Its bottle,
lancers.jpg

Photo by Ryan Opaz on Flickr

apparently good for candles as well, is just as unique.

Both of these sweet wines were released in 1940s after World War II, when Vintage Wines of New York predicted that wine would become popular in the United States. They disappeared for awhile, until both brands decided to remarket themselves in the 2000s. Check out Lancers' fancy Flash page today versus an ad from the 1970s.

If you want to know more about these wines, there's an interesting post at catavino that will give you more about the history.

Do
you agree? Were Mateus and Lancers as popular as my parents claim? Has
anyone tried this stuff recently?  What's it like? White Zin comes to
mind when I look at the pictures. Something tells me they're not
French-style rosés.

I guess we need the Mad Men writers and researchers to help us out on this one. But we want to know: What wine would Don Draper drink?  Story idea!? Seriously, there's great fodder here for an episode about wine advertising in the 60s and 70s. Readers, don't you agree?

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