Pick 13 kinda sucks

Pick 13 kinda sucks
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About a month ago, the Cubs rolled out a new ticket package for the upcoming season called the "Pick 13 Plan." I'm here to tell you it kinda sucks.

So why 13? Gee, I dunno.

More than pseudo-subliminal advertising however, the plan is meant to give Cubs fans a way to reserve their seats before single-game tickets go on sale later this month (Feb. 25?). Each of the six plans guarantees one seat to two marquee matchups against some combination of the Yankees, Cardinals or White Sox. The other 11 games are chosen a la carte from selected contests throughout the rest of the season.

After comparing and contrasting the six plans, I can tell you that Pick 13 is predominantly loaded with early-season weekday games featuring unattractive opponents...otherwise known as difficult tickets to scalp for substantial profit.

But if you insist on purchasing a Pick 13 Plan, the GROTA investigative team wants you to know which plan is the best of the worst.

Before one can start gorging on the baseball buffet, one must choose one type of plan for their one-seat selections: bowl seating or bleachers. Each seating assignment offers three different plans (A, B, or C) from which you can customize 11 of the 13 games. Cool? Cool.

Each plan is broken into 11 separate sections. Some sections consist of multiple teams, dates, and times to choose from. Others are less diverse, often giving you little choice in terms of the opponent. At first glance, the bowl seating plans appear to have more options than the bleachers. Of course, it goes deeper than that.

Bowl seating plans A (Cards, Yanks), B (Sox, Yanks), and C (Cards, Sox) all have the same menu. Each plan offers the exact same choices as you make your way through each of the 11 sections. Excluding the marquee games, here's a breakdown of what the bowl seats offer...

Maximum number of weekend games: 3
Maximum number of night games: 5
Maximum number of games against quality teams*: 5

(*teams with a .500 record or better in 2010.)

It's important to understand these numbers will fluctuate based on your personal preferences. For example, picking more weekend games to accommodate your work schedule will result in fewer night games.

The most intriguing aspect of the bowl seats is in the monthly breakdown, which is heavily weighted at the beginning and the end of the season, but with some flexibility.

April: 5 (1 required)
May: 2 (1 required)
June: 0
July: 1
August: 2
September: 5 (none required)
 
The bleachers, as in real life, is where things start to get interesting, confusing, and disorienting. Each plan deviates from the other in some way, and the bleachers offer a wildly different experience than the bowl seats when it comes to monthly scheduling.

Here's a breakdown of all three bleacher plans...

Plan A (Yanks, Cards)
Maximum number of weekend games: 3
Maximum number of night games: 5
Maximum number of games against quality teams: 8
April: 5 (4 required)
May: 2 (2 required)
June: 2
July: 2
August: 1
September: 1

Plan B (Sox, Yanks)
Maximum number of weekend games: 3
Maximum number of night games: 5
Maximum number of games against quality teams: 7
April: 5 (4 required)
May: 3 (2 required)
June: 2
July: 2
August: 0
September: 1

Plan C (Cards, Sox)
Maximum number of weekend games: 3 (guaranteed)
Maximum number of night games: 5
Maximum number of games against quality teams: 7
April: 3 (2 required)
May: 3 (2 required)
June: 3
July: 3 (1 required)
August: 1
September: 3 (1 required)

As you can see, the bleacher plans offer more options in terms of quality opponents. In fact, Plan A and B guarantee a weekday night game in June against the World Series champion Giants. However, Plan A and B require that six of your 11 selections be games played in April/May. Plan C, on the other hand, only requires four of your choices be in April/May while offering more options in June and July. Plan C also guarantees three weekend games, unlike the five other plans.

All things considered, Bleacher Plan C seems to have the most variety when it comes to quality opponents and monthly options. Three guaranteed weekend games in addition to the two marquee games is a nice touch. On the downside, you don't get to see the Yankees at Wrigley.

So you've made it to the end of this drivel. Hopefully you've learned two things: Bleacher Plan C is the best if you don't care
about the Yankees series (otherwise, Bleacher Plan B ain't bad) and
baseball really needs to start. Like, now. 

Personally, I don't have the money to spend on 13 tickets in
advance, but I'd like to hear from those of you who bought or are thinking of
buying a Pick 13 Plan. Which plan do you like best? Is it worth it? What
factors will determine your plan and game selections?

More importantly, since the Pick 13 Plan clearly sucks, what is your preferred method of getting tickets? StubHub? Scalpers? Work associates? Suga daddy/mama?
Fans helping fans. It's a beautiful thing.

Comments

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  • Kinda?

  • In reply to EdNickow:

    I was going to write "sorta," but I thought the language was too strong for this family-friendly site.

  • In reply to EdNickow:

    A mix between the Cubs fans I know and StubHub. I also go to a Cubs/Cards game every year because my step dad and three step brothers are Cardinal fans. Last year we went to Wrigley, but the two years before that, we went to STL for teh game

  • In reply to EdNickow:

    Yeah and the $900 price tag for the pick 13 kinda sucks too. I am disappointed the prices of tickets are a commodity being traded in today's day and age. I want to goto a game with my family but don't want the $600 price tage along with it!

  • my best way to get tickets is SummerGuy. Seriously, I did not go to Wrigley once in 2010. Why? I hated the 2010 Cubs. I will wait to see if the 2011 Cubs are different. I am led to believe that it will be somewhat more attractive.

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