It's time to move to North Dakota for a job: 3.1% Unemployment is the lowest in U.S.

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Fargo, North Dakota

Take out your parkas! We may have to move to North Dakota for employment! At 3.1 % North Dakota has the lowest unemployment rate in the country as of April, 2010. With Illinois unemployment hovering at 10.8% it seems that job hunters should check out what job opportunities are available in this state!

One of my favorite movies was Fargo. I laughed at the strange flat sounding accents and the small town mentality of the people in Fargo. I cringed at the mounds of snow and sub zero temperatures as I questioned how anyone could live in that area of the country.

Not anymore. North Dakota may be the new Las Vegas for jobs. Dog sledding may be the replacement for golf and fur lined boots may replace our designer shoes!

Last week's national jobless claim increased by another 13,000. Illinois is poised to lose more jobs as the local governments and service businesses tighten their budgets. We are going the wrong direction in creating jobs; the losses keep coming.

And this issue of "no hire" is going to be with us for years as is the intense competition for the paltry jobs created. It seems to me that a smart decision would be to move to states where there are more jobs and less people to fill them. Other states with lowest unemployment rates are South Dakota, Nebraska, Vermont and New Hampshire.

The commonality of all of these states, except Nebraska, is that they just may be colder than Chicago! Though I think Chicago is second to Moscow as to dreadful winters. So just how bad can it be to live in these states?

The message here is to open up your job search to other states that are more receptive to your job skills. If this means moving to another state, so be it. If you own a home and can't sell it now, rent it and rent another home near your job.

A very close friend of mine's husband finally get a job in Nashville after looking for a year for employment. They have three kids. One is in college; the others are in high school. She is quitting her job here in Chicago, putting her house on the market (they have equity in it), enrolling her children in high school in Nashville and leaving this summer.

Sure, I'll miss her, but good friends are always friends, no matter where they live. She is on a new journey and they have found a way to keep their family intact and survive this deep recession. I'd advise you to do the same.

Last week's national jobless claim increased by another 13,000. Illinois is poised to lose more jobs as the local governments and service businesses tighten their budgets. We are going the wrong direction in creating jobs; the losses keep coming.

And this issue of "no hire" is going to be with us for years as is the intense competition for the paltry jobs created. It seems to me that a smart decision would be to move to states where there are more jobs and less people to fill them. Other states with lowest unemployment rates are South Dakota, Nebraska, Vermont and New Hampshire.

The commonality of all of these states, except Nebraska, is that they just may be colder than Chicago! Though I think Chicago is second to Moscow as to dreadful winters. So just how bad can it be to live in these states?

The message here is to open up your job search to other states that are more receptive to your job skills. If this means moving to another state, so be it. If you own a home and can't sell it now, rent it and rent another home near your job.

A very close friend of mine's husband finally get a job in Nashville after looking for a year for employment. They have three kids. One is in college; the others are in high school. She is quitting her job here in Chicago, putting her house on the market (they have equity in it), enrolling her children in high school in Nashville and leaving this summer.

Sure, I'll miss her, but good friends are always friends, no matter where they live. She is on a new journey and they have found a way to keep their family intact and survive this deep recession. I'd advise you to do the same.

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