Lessons From Beverly?

Lessons From Beverly?

There's a WBEZ story online from Natalie Moore [@natalieymoore] about Beverly you might find interesting to read.  It's part of the Curious City series, and asks how Beverly became and remains integrated while most other South Side neighborhoods experienced so much white flight -- especially without an anchor university.  Or, is Beverly's diversity an outdated myth of some kind? "Despite the numbers, the schools in Beverly today don’t necessarily reflect the diversity of the neighborhood."

 

 

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  • "Most chalk it up to the strong Irish-Catholic identity and Catholic schools in the community. Morgan Park High School now has a wall-to-wall International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme that current BAPA executive director Matt Walsh hopes will be a draw to families."

    Oh, please. Pat. Pat. Pat.

  • Natalie Moore’s story about Beverly was really worth listening to and reading. I would have liked the story to explore the racial composition of the Catholic Schools that many white Beverly residents are sending their children to. Particularly St. Barnabas School, St. Cajetan School, and St. John Fisher School.

    None of these schools provide public data on their student body’s racial composition. St. Barnabas School in its PR photo shows 12 students of whom only one might be African American. St. Cajetan School includes this statement on its website “Many of our families share an Irish heritage and all of our families share the same pride in our school.” St Cajetan School’s website contains many photos and there were only a handful of students who might be non-white. Similarly St. John Fisher School’s website provides no racial composition data, but has a recruitment video that depicts pictures of only a few students who might be Natalie Moore’s story about Beverly was really worth listening to and reading. I would have liked the story to explore the racial composition of the Catholic Schools that many white Beverly residents are sending their children to. Particularly St. Barnabas School, St. Cajetan School, and St. John Fisher School.
    None of these schools provide public data on their student body’s racial composition. St. Barnabas School in its PR photo shows 12 students of whom only one might be African American. St. Cajetan School includes this statement on its website “Many of our families share an Irish heritage and all of our families share the same pride in our school.” St Cajetan School’s website contains many photos and there were only a handful of students who might be non-white. Similarly St. John Fisher School’s website provides no racial composition data, but has a recruitment video that depicts pictures of only a few non-white students.

    Particularly interesting were the posted comments relating to the WBEZ story. Wendynal C. Daniels’ comment is really the only one discussing the experience of an African American student growing up in Beverly. In part here is what she wrote: “My block seemed to me to have about an equal number of black and white families. But I knew that the white families sent their kids to Catholic school. Our neighbors on either side were also Black, but one of those families also sent their kids to Catholic school. Although the black families became friends regardless of the schools the kids attended, there really was no interaction between the black and white families. Period. We lived peacefully and spoke politely when we saw one another, but that was it.”

    Now for my experience with Beverly. At the end of 1960s I was one of the better CPS wrestlers on the north side of the city. Morgan Park HS was an athletic power house back then and I wrestled at the school several times in high school, I never saw a non-white student in the building let alone on its wrestling team. Even in 1969-70 Lake View's wrestling team was about 40% minority students, including one African American.

    Moreover, Morgan Park had services for its athletes that I never saw at Lake View HS, like clear towels laundered for student athletes, sparkling locker rooms, for then state of the art weight lifting equipment, and one of the best wrestling mats I had seen other than the one at Lane Tech and at Lake View. The turn out of parents for the Morgan Park team was simply amazing for wrestling, something I had never seen on the north side of the city. Overall I honestly thought I was in a suburb back then.

    Rod Estvan
    .

  • In reply to Rodestvan:

    St. Barnabas School is the most diverse. I am guessing 25 % non-white.

  • In reply to Teacher dad:

    Catholic Schools are open to anyone who wants to apply. If there are spaces non-parishioners and non-Catholics are accepted just as they were when I went to a Catholic School in the 50's.

  • Sorry for the double postings in the above.

    rod

  • Mr. Walsh's hope will never come to fruition for MPHS. The white folk of Beverly will not send their children there as one can see by the popularity of the Ag school and the Catholic HSs near by.
    As for Sutherland, there are members of the LSC that do not like the way the student population plays out and may think that by removing a successful principal the minority number will go down. If this Bulldog slate wins again, shame.

  • this is a repose of something I wrote a couple of years ago it is still
    true today

    The Gauntlet

    I started CTC in June 1967 .Many days I would run 111th. to
    Monterey, or whatever that little street was called, then up the Ryan
    To the University of 69 th. Street. One of the most congested, crowed
    corners was 111th and Vincennes.

    I would often go that way to Bowen until September 1970 when I began At The Warehouse. For 25 years after that it was up the Ryan, or Vincennes Ave.to Simeon.In all that time,28 years if you count college the area around Morgan Park High School underwent the best, or worst, urban renewal I ever saw.

    For blocks around the school EVERY building save three, was demolished.Only the Post Office, Catholic Charities, and the Police Station remained on 111th st. All that money spent when teachers had to drink from a garden hose in the third floor bathroom at Simeon. Why did the city do all that destruction?

    I can only speculate that it was done so kids living west of the tracks did not Have to run a gauntlet to, or from, Morgan Park High School. Clout ruled even back in the day. Today we have a new Simeon, I no longer go that way And Chicago’s residency policy should ensure a fully integrated Morgan Park High.If any segment of the Beverly community has abandoned their neighborhood
    High school ,shame on them, it dosen’t have to be that way.

  • Rod Estvan: You forgot Christ the King, across from Kellogg. Looks like Apartheid South Africa.

  • Comparing it to Apartheid Era South Africa is extreme hyperbole. My question is how the heck is 50% of Kellogg students considered low income in one of the most expensive neighborhoods on the Southside?

  • 50% poverty -good point-should be a concern for the OIG-- boundaries go east to Ashland, (a poorer side or town compared to north beverly.

  • Regarding Apartheid: The VISUALS, not the policy.

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