AM News: CPS Finally Releasing Magnet School Data [upd]

AM News:  CPS Finally Releasing Magnet School Data [upd]

CPS set to release new data on selective and magnet school
admissions
Catalyst:  CPS
officials will release on Tuesday the long-awaited racial breakdowns of
admissions to selective enrollment and magnet schools, and will
announce a blue-ribbon committee to examine them... [UPDATE:  Click "Read More" to see CPS release.]

news2.gif

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Elementary School.

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

July 20, 2010

 

CPS Releases Preliminary Results for Selective Enrollment, Magnet Admissions; Sets Community Forums to Review Current Process

 

 

Chicago Public Schools today released preliminary socio-economic and racial diversity data regarding 2010-11 admissions in the District's selective enrollment and magnet schools.

 

The numbers reported are pre-enrollment numbers - students who have registered and are projected to attend selective and magnet schools - and will shift between now and this fall, District officials stressed.

 

The numbers are based on the one-year policy that was approved by the Chicago Board of Education late last year. The policy, which uses socio-economic variables instead of race as a factor in admissions, was established after a federal court judge vacated a longstanding desegregation consent decree last fall.

 

The one-year policy that governs admissions to Chicago Public Schools' selective enrollment and magnet schools - along with audits, and tighter and more centralized control of the admissions - has created a fair and equitable process for CPS students and families, District officials said.

 

The one-year policy that governs admissions for the 2010-11 school year, will be reviewed and revised as needed, said CPS Chief Executive Officer Ron Huberman. A blue-ribbon commission is being formed and three community forums will be scheduled to garner public input on the policy.

 

The one-year policy established criteria to replace the race-based considerations that were part of the consent decree. Under the one-year policy, approximately 40 percent of those admitted to selective enrollment high schools are drawn from applicants based on their point ranking drawn from such criteria as test scores and grades; the remaining admissions are based on point ranking within four socio-economic groups drawn from updated census tract data.

 

Selective enrollment high school principals also were given the latitude to admit up to 5 percent of their incoming class through discretion with those picks subject to a review process.

 

Magnet school students were classified into one of three groups -- sibling, proximity or general.  If space was available, all siblings at the entry level were admitted. Up to 40 percent of the remaining seats were set aside for students within the proximity of each school, and the remaining seats were divided into four equal socio-economic diversity groups.  Lotteries were then held for each group of seats. 

 

 "From the time the consent decree was vacated, our deliberations and decision-making have been governed by a determination to preserve diversity in selective enrollment and magnet schools, and to ensure transparency in the application process," Huberman said.

 

Preliminary data show that for selective enrollment high schools, entry-level admissions were 23 percent majority and 77 percent minority, identical to last year. Within the minority subgroups, the preliminary data shows some shift, with Asian and African-American enrollment slightly down and Hispanic enrollment higher.

 

Potential reasons for these shifts include an increase in applications from Hispanic students (up 4.1 percent), while applications from African-American students declined by 2.6 percent. Additionally, applicant diversity has increased for such selective enrollment high schools as Westinghouse, King and Lindblom.

 

At selective enrollment high schools, 4,651 offers were made for about 3,000 seats.  Officials pointed out that final results of the current policy will not be clear until the 20th day of school; that all numbers released today are a snapshot in time and may shift.

 

Huberman said CPS plans a full review of the one-year policy led by a blue-ribbon commission. The blue ribbon commission will include the following members:

 

Alderman Latasha Thomas, Education Committee Chairman

Miguel DeValle, City Clerk

Anna Alvarado, Principal of Hawthorne Elementary

Alan Mather, Principal of Lindblom Math & Science Academy

Cynthia Flowers, Black Star Project

Lisa Scruggs Esq. Jenner &Block

Bertha Magana, Latino Education Alliance

Dr. Mary Davidson, PhD, Center for Protection of Children  

 

The commission plans three two-hour public forums on the policy: on July 27, August 3 and August 10, all from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Locations will be announced.

 

Huberman also noted that CPS has taken numerous administrative steps to ensure fairness and equity for Chicago Public Schools families who opt to apply to a selective enrollment or magnet school. Many of these steps relate directly to allegations that were investigated by the Inspector General and are designed to avoid a repeat of inappropriate admissions or actions. Among those:

 

n      Centralizing the admissions process for selective enrollment high schools. All applications were submitted to the Office of Academic Enhancement (OAE) with seats assigned under the Board policy.

n      Centralizing policies and procedures for transfer students. Principals must submit an affidavit explaining why they feel a transfer candidate would be able to succeed at their school and submit it to OAE for review and approval.

n      Principal discretion. While the Board and CEO determined that principal discretion is an important part of the selective enrollment high school admissions process (discretion was eliminated for magnet principals for one year), specific guidelines that govern discretionary picks were established:

o       Principals must report any prohibited contact with elected officials and CPS officials and employees.

o       Principals must sign an affidavit that they were not unduly influenced in regarding a discretionary pick.

o       A panel reviewed all principal selection materials and forms, and reviewed principals regarding compliance with policies and guidelines.

 

n      Establishing a clear policy regarding influence in the admissions process. Beyond the guidelines governing principal discretion, CPS officials and employees with children in the application process must certify they did not attempt to exert influence to assist their children.

 

"We intentionally approached the Board with a one-year policy, the goal being to see what worked and what didn't, and to act accordingly. And we are preparing further administrative steps to ensure continued fairness in applications and admissions. The upcoming review and additional action items will allow us to make further improvements in the process."

 

Following the public forums, the commission will develop a final report with any recommended changes to the existing one-year policy. The District's Office of Academic Enhancement and the CPS Law Department, in conjunction with the CEO's office, will consider the report and public comments when developing a new policy to be presented to the Chicago Board of Education.

 

 

All Selective Enrollment High Schools

Race

2010/11

Projected Enrollment

4-yr entry level average

2009/2010 Total Enrollment

African-American

32%

34%

34%

Asian/Pacific Islander

10%

12%

13%

Hispanic

33%

28%

28%

Native American/Alaskan

1%

 0

Not Available

2%

 0

 0

White

23%

23%

25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

All GEAP Programs

Race

2010/11

Projected Enrollment

4-yr entry level average

2009/2010 Total Enrollment

African-American

38%

43%

40%

Asian/Pacific Islander

11%

11%

12%

Hispanic

17%

22%

23%

White

28%

28%

24%

 

All Magnet High Schools (No-attendance boundary)

Race

2010/11

Projected Enrollment

4-yr entry level average

2009/2010 Total Enrollment

African-American

48%

50%

53%

Asian/Pacific Islander

6%

7%

7%

Hispanic

28%

21%

21%

White

15%

19%

19%

 

 

All Magnet Elementary  Schools (No-attendance boundary)

Race

2010/11

Projected Enrollment

4-yr entry level average

2009/2010 Total Enrollment

African-American

38%

42%

46%

Asian/Pacific Islander

6%

8%

7%

Hispanic

31%

29%

30%

White

21%

19%

16%

 

 

Chicago Public Schools serves approximately 409,000 students in more than 670 schools. It is the third-largest school district in the nation.

Filed under: Daily News Roundup

Tags: @globalfooter

Comments

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  • zorn wants to know how to use tests fairly to evaluate teachers --

    http://blogs.chicagotribune.com/news_columnists_ezorn/2010/07/teachers.html

    i'm not sure it can be done well right now but maybe you have a better idea on that

  • a blogger says that bringing huberman to cps is one of the best things daley has done -- along with the parking meter deal and the walmart thing. is this a joke?

    http://www.chicagonow.com/blogs/trackitfan/2010/07/a-few-good-things-mayor-daley-has-done.html

  • here's the data on magnet applications and acceptances from CPS:

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
    July 20, 2010

    CPS Releases Preliminary Results for Selective Enrollment, Magnet Admissions; Sets Community Forums to Review Current Process

    Chicago Public Schools today released preliminary socio-economic and racial diversity data regarding 2010-11 admissions in the District

  • Ok, I have looked at the CPS press release, and the first question I had was why did CPS not release the individual school data? Are there schools that look very different than the averages in the press release?

    Clearly CPS has this data otherwise they could not have created the tables in the press release. I think most knowledgeable Chicagoans want to know what did the enrollment process create in terms of racial change, if any, at the three highest performing high schools Young, Payton, and North Side Prep.

    Numerous minority based organizations, and the ACLU, had questions about what the near north side magnet schools would look like. Since the principal of Hawthorne Elementary is on the proposed Blue Ribbon committee shouldn't this school's projected enrollment data for kindergarten be publicly known prior to the public meetings?

    Rod Estvan

  • white and wealthy kids got more spots, while black kids in particular lost ground, according to this from catalyst:

    http://www.catalyst-chicago.org/notebook/index.php/entry/759

    unbelievable.

  • In reply to AlexanderRusso:

    Wasn't it specifically broken down by economic tiers? I can see a loss of minority kids, but it seems to me that if white enrollment increased, we will see more white kids from lower economic tiers or at least according to the census tracts. Wasn't that the whole point of the federal decree? To increase economic diversity?
    Of the schools that changed the most in racial demographics, those were largely regional gifted centers and classical schools. That tells me that the highest scores came from kids who were white, regardless of economic status.
    I would think that most schools with greatly increased white populations will see more white kids on free lunch and will see more kids from neighborhoods like Humboldt Park, Rogers Park, and the Northwest side. Areas that have a growing caucasian population, but are still fairly poor. Most white families from those areas are middle class families who can't afford better. They will benefit from being in a less wealthy tract.

  • In reply to AlexanderRusso:

    Why are we still talking about skin color? The new system was designed to ensure socio-economic diversity, not racial diversity. Poor is the new black.

  • coonley is projected to go from 39 percent white all the way up to 83 percent, according to this tribune article.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-met-cps-magnets-diversity-20100720,0,7859864.story

    black numbers at northside were so low that they had to add 25 spaces (the gut check, remember?) to get the number above 10 percent.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-met-cps-magnets-diversity-20100720,0,7859864.story

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