The Mayor's (Latest) Random Idea For What "They" Should Do

"They
should get juvenile records in the school system. They should know that
this child has been a victim and this child has been an offender.
There's where it starts. Usually, victims become offenders."
(Daley makes case for more cops Sun Times)

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  • what about giving schools the resources they need so we have no victims and juvenile offenders? that seems a lot more sensible and better for society. Oh forgot, then the king would not be able to give out money to his buddies to fix the problems he creates.

  • As much as I support law enforcement, being a former officer myself, you just can't shake a Badge & Stick at EVERY social ill. Instead od Mayor Daley trying to once again make everything a simplistic Cops & Robbers problem, he should try to not look for the easy answer, but to the harder solution. Why not try to bring together the same sort of great brain trust that he did to try and secure the 2016 Olympics for the city to the table to help save our neighborhoods?

    Our civic and political leaders should try to come up with solutions that would address issues facing the families of our city, and the at-risk youth on our streets. Create innovative employment opportunities, improve the curriculum in our public schools, try and build safeer neighborhoods, things like that. I know it's hard and costly, but isn't it well worth it?

    Let's do something a little different than waiting for the victim to become the offender.

  • How about taking kids complaints seriously when they tell you they're being victimized. How about understanding that bullying in victimizing.
    When a kid gets slapped around the head, spit on, books knocked away, thrown in trash, people tell them to "toughen up." And when they do "toughen up" and throw a punch we suspend them for fighting.
    We tell kids the bullies will respect them if they fight back, and then we tell them they should know better than to fight back.
    Is it any wonder some kids fell caught in a hopeless situation?

  • vaughnchicago has some great ideas. I hope now that the Olympics thing is over, the mayor can concentrate on some of our serious problems. The sad thing, however, is that the mayor is likely not capable of bringing divergent opinions together. He tends to surround himself with people who do not disagree with him. But the resources and the talent are here if he would ever decide to use them

  • As goofy as the quote from Mayor Daley on victims becoming perpetrators sounds:

  • True, Rod. "As the violence has increased among CPS youth we are seeing fewer students being identified as needing special education services for emotional disturbance. The reason for this I think most teachers reading this blog would agree is not that on average poor inner city youth are getting more mentally healthy, it is because CPS is systematically discouraging identification of these youth in order to not pay for services. This part of the dirty truth Mr. Duncan does not want to discuss along with the impact of the turnaround policy."

    I find it shocking that reporters, such as those in the Tribune and the rest, covering this response to the Fenger story are missing this element entirely. Entirely. And it's sad so many are jumping on the bandwagon without talking about CPS and its dismal behavior toward students with disabilities from Kindergarten upwards. Year after year after year.

    That's criminal behavior, too.

  • Retired Principal said: What will Daley and Huberman do for the other 44 high schools (who they won't identify), who don't have a "culture of calm"?

  • No coverage of the fight last week after football game between Sullivan HS and Wells. Did anyone at these schools bother to report it? I have been told that it is on tape too!
    Cudos to the 21st C.

  • at our school of over 1600 students, CPS cut the nurse and social work services. And boy do we have problems--gang problems and killings and violence in the 'hood. And these students bring this to school with them everyday. HELP.

  • Worth the read:
    http://www.substancenews.net/articles.php?page=925§ion=Article

  • I was a victim of fights and bullying in 8th grade (a lot) and only twice in HS. I NEVER became an offender. The mayor is a bully--

  • We are under referring students who are probably behind academically due to undiagnosed learning disabilities/emotional disabilities. Our jails are full of inmates who are barely literate yet graduated from eighth grade in CPS with no access to specialized services.
    We are told not to refer students for special education because there is no money yet Mr. Huberman can find money for his alma mater, University of Chicago, for mentoring teachers, a teacher evaluation program and who knows what else.
    I find it ironic that he went to U of C on the CPD tuition reimbursement perk when the lowly teachers have to pay for their own masters' degrees.

    Ask any elementary teacher at any school and they will predict who will graduate from high school based upon academics and level of parental support. We do not need any more million dollar surveys or teams of experts. Try the unthinkable-ask the teachers about how hard it is to get help for troubled students. Ask the students how much time the teachers have to spend on these needy students at the expense of those students who want to learn.

  • But how can you tell if a child is actually emotionally or learning disabled as opposed to just having a lousy personality or bad parenting? I don't think just being a jerk or having no motivation or self-disciple should be enough to get a student referred.

    Are there assessments that check brain functioning or other more cut and dried physical functioning or is it more of a psychological screening kind of thing?

  • (imho) First comes the evaluation of the student to determine if there are any disabilities that are blocking his access to FAPE. Some eval is on physical systems and some one psychological and neurological. Sometimes the results point to physical impairments (an information processing problem, for example) and sometimes to psychological (which many times seem to have roots in neurological problems). Of course, if the school refuses to evaluate, you're dead in the water.

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