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This Week's Question: Who Are You?

Who_are_youThere are more changes coming to this site -- good ones, I think, to make the comments sections flow more readily and to bring in more parents along with the teachers and administrators who are already in the know.  Or, I think that's who you are.  That's this week's question:  Who are you?  North side teacher, South side parent, elementary principal, first-year rookie?  Put as much or little information as you want, but try and put something. I'll go first...

I am a Chicago-raised education writer who has this blog and a
national one. I grew up in Lakeview -- Latin Kings territory then --
and lived until last year in Wicker Park right near Pritzker Elementary
(new preschool program coming soon, I hear). My sister got beat up at
Alcott so they sent us to Parker. (How's Alcott doing these days,
anyway, I wonder?)  I played pickup basketball as a kid on the courts
outside Nettlehorst (now a parking lot).

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  • I'm a concerned citizen who lived, until my Ma fell and needed someone to stay with her, on the west side in Austin. Currently I'm living in Berwyn with Ma. I'm just a concerned citizen, not an educator. I'm opposed to vouchers but believe in public school choice. I also believe in public schools.

    I attended public schools in Central IL. Our district spent at least 30% less per student than CPS did. Until reading this blog, I never understood why CPS needed so much money to deliver the same product I got down yonder. Of course, where I lived, we did not have to deal with the problems of persistent generational poverty, with disruptive students, or with a large special ed population. It probably helped too that our housing prices were considerably less than Chicagoland's housing prices.

  • I grew up in Montreal and have lived in the states since the early eighties. Ten years ago I paid Educational Placement Service $3,000 for an interview at a Title I school on the south side with all of the problems you'd expect.I was a stockbroker at the time, but Clinton's go-go nineties made it possible for me to leave that gig. My first class of fifth graders in 1997 had 34 members ranging in age from 10-14,old books, old desks, and all of the problems you'd expect. Geez, the projects were still up! I stayed for seven years and loved every minute of it. Once you've worked on commision,everything job related seems like a cakewalk. I'm at a different Title I school now, but one with all the bells and whistles. A corporate entity interested in fostering financial literacy to Chicago's most needy sponsors my new school which has been open eight years.We're an AMP school and I have new desks,new books a discretionary budget to purchase what need,when I need it and no more than 20 kids in a class. Our scores are high and the administration is as professional as it comes. That three grand I paid to EPS was the best investment I ever made.

  • I am a 4th year history teacher at Farragut Career Academy where I also coach the debate team. I post every now and then but read every day; especially when I need a pick-me-up to remind me that, all things considered, I have it pretty good where I am. I'm a retread having switched careers from telecommunications after having one too many dotcoms go bankrupt on me. I've lived in Chicago for ten years and spent most of my growing up in California.

  • I am a 4th year history teacher at Farragut Career Academy where I also coach the debate team. I post every now and then but read every day; especially when I need a pick-me-up to remind me that, all things considered, I have it pretty good where I am. I'm a retread having switched careers from telecommunications after having one too many dotcoms go bankrupt on me. I've lived in Chicago for ten years and spent most of my growing up in California.

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