Ten Years After -- Not Where We Want To Be

Critics and supporters of mayoral control alike will want to take a look at the Catalyst report card (PDF) on progress made or not during Mayor Daley's tenure overseeing CPS, with stats pulled together by data guru Mallika Ahluwalia.

"As the numbers in this
district report card will show, test scores are up, high school
graduation rates are up, first-year teachers are less likely to leave
and new schools are popping up all over town," states the report card.  But
"Teacher turnover in high-poverty schools is getting worse.
One of every three high school students drops out. More than half of
all children still do not meet academic standards.   Simply put, weve
got a long, long way to go."

The report card also touches on how CPS compares to other districts around the country (not so well).
"Chicago doesnt stack up, even when differences in student population are taken into account.
On the 4th-grade [NAEP] reading exam, Chicago posted one of the lowest pass rates for low-income students, beating only Atlanta, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Even so, that was better than the citys results for better-off students, where Chicago tied for last place with Los Angeles and San Diego."

Brutal. 

For more on how CPS compares to other big city districts, check out my comparison of CPS to LA, NYC, Philadelphia, and Houston in Chicago magazine from last month:

Filed under: 125 S. Clark Street

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  • It seems that the mayor no longer pushes CPS leadership to improve. He seems satisfied with slow or no progress. Without this outside pressure it seems that schools have stagnated. Chicago is no longer a model for urban school improvement.

  • It seems that the mayor no longer pushes CPS leadership to improve. He seems satisfied with slow or no progress. Without this outside pressure it seems that schools have stagnated. Chicago is no longer a model for urban school improvement.

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