A Survival Budget From CPS

Survival2"Chicago Public Schools today released a $5.8 billion “keep afloat”
budget that includes an additional $98 million in expected state aid
and a 3-percent raise for teachers," according to this August Catalyst story (here) and some sidebars here and here

Or, if you want to look at the proposed budget in its raw form, look here (Download 080607_FY08ProposedBudget.doc).

UPDATE:  CPS released a presser (see below) explaining its stance, and announced public hearings on Aug. 14 at Lane Tech High School, 2501 W. Addison St., Aug. 15 at Juarez Community Academy, 2150 S. Laflin St., and Aug. 16 at Morgan Park Academy, 1744 W. Pryor Ave. The hearings each night will run from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Board of Education is expected to vote on the FY08 budget at its Aug. 22 meeting. 

From CPS:

CPS
Releases 2008 Budget
Despite State
Delay;

Proposed
Tax Increase Due to Inaction in Springfield

School
System Continues to Create More Learning Opportunities for Students

 

Officials with the
Chicago Public Schools today released their proposed budget for fiscal year
2008 and directly linked a local property tax increase to the fact that the
state has not yet fundamentally reformed education funding in Illinois.   

 

            By state law,
the Chicago Board of Education must adopt a budget by the end of August, even
though the State of Illinois
has not yet passed a budget.  The proposed budget assumes approximately $100
million in new state funding, $55 million in new property taxes, and $73
million from reserves.

 

Ongoing union contract
negotiations are adding even more uncertainty to the budget, which assumes 3%
salary increases for all unionized employees.  Every one percent of negotiated
salary increase costs the district approximately $25 million.

 

Chief Executive Officer
Arne Duncan lamented a lack of action by lawmakers in Springfield to pass
funding reform, saying, “Year after year, we are forced to raise property
taxes because Springfield has not yet fundamentally reformed the way our
schools are funded so that we can keep our system moving forward and give every
student in every school the education they need and deserve.”

 

“The real reason we
can continue investing in proven strategies like our after school programs and
improving teacher quality is because of the support of local taxpayers and our
continuing commitment to cutting costs,” Duncan said.  “Still, the budget
we’re announcing today does not reflect all we need to do to take
our system to the next level -- it reflects what we can afford to
do,” he added.

 

The overall budget of
$4.9 billion is up by $262 million from last year, a 5.5% increase.  This is
largely due to higher salaries, pensions and health care costs as well as debt
service on a $400 million capital program primarily for new school
construction.

 

Chief Education Officer
Barbara Eason Watkins outlined new or expanded school-based investments for
full-day kindergarten, after-school programs, high school reform, teacher and
principal mentoring and induction, sports, post-secondary planning, college test
prep, dropout prevention, and counseling.

 

            Board
President Rufus Williams praised the team for investing more money in the
classroom, saying, “Our board is determined to adopt a budget that puts
the needs of our children above all else, despite the fact that we still
don’t have funding reform.  Our job is to open schools on September 4th
and that’s what we’re going to do.”

 

            Budget
Director Beth Swanson said that administrative costs will drop from 4.2 percent
of the operating budget to 4.1 percent next year.  She also said that
enrollment declines and retirements, as well as lower private school tuitions
for children with disabilities, will save the district $63 million in 2008.  A
host of other efficiencies beginning next year will save up to $37 million more
starting in 2009.

 

“All of these
efficiency measures are making it possible for us to shift more dollars into
the classroom,” Swanson said.

 

The budget will be the
subject of public hearings on Aug. 14 at Lane
Tech High
School, 2501 W.
  Addison St., Aug. 15 at Juarez
Community Academy,
2150 S. Laflin St.,
and Aug. 16 at Morgan
Park Academy,
1744 W. Pryor Ave.
The hearings each night will run from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Board of Education
is expected to vote on the FY08 budget at its Aug. 22 meeting. 

Filed under: Campaigns & Clout

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  • High school transformation is new curriculum and materials, including professional development and ongoing coaching for teachers in the core subjects (English, Matn, Science) for students in grades 9, 10 and 11. Credit recovery are classes for students to make up required courses that they have failed.

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