18 Of 19 New Schools Approved

Only one of the 19 new schools that Arne Duncan proposed for next year and beyond didn't get approved at yesterday's Board meeting, according to the press release below.  I'm told it's Community Services West that got held back, but is expected to go up to the Board next month. Congrats and condolences to all those who  got the green light.  You've got a busy year ahead of you to get students and get the doors open on time.  You'll get accolades from the press and from the Board, but many of those who comment here won't take what you're doing seriously.  Thank God there's only two more years until we get to 100 new schools and 2009-2010.

 

For more information contact:

Malon Edwards

CPS Office of Communications

Phone: 773-553-1620

Fax: 773-553-1622

Website: http://www.cps.k12.il.us

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Oct. 25, 2007

Eighteen New Schools
Approved by Board of Education

School for autistic
children, U of C charter and elementary replicators among approved

      The
Chicago Board of Education approved 14 schools to open in the fall of
2008 and four
 schools to open in the fall of 2009
at yesterday’s board meeting.

      Among
the approved was the Hope Institute, serving K-8 children with autism
and developmental disabilities, Disney II and Burroughs II, replicating
the academic successes at Disney Magnet School and Burroughs Elementary,
and a charter school that will be run by the University of Chicago and
serve middle-grade students.

      
The schools were among 19 new school proposals recommended to the Board
by Chicago Public Schools Chief Executive Officer Arne Duncan two weeks
ago. One school, Community Services West, was deferred by the Board
until its November meeting.

      “We’re
very excited about the truly unique, high-quality education opportunities
these schools will give parents and children,” said Chicago Board
of Education President Rufus Williams. “We’ve always said that not
every child learns the same way, and these schools are an excellent
example of just how diverse great learning environments can be.”

      The 14
schools approved by the Board for 2008 are:

  • Virtual Opportunities Inside
      a School Environment (VOISE),
    a performance school that will serve
      grades 9-12.  It will fully integrate technology into the classroom to
      provide students with enriched learning environments. VOISE will open
      fall of 2008 at Austin High School, 231 N Pine.

  • Noble Street Charter High
      School UIC,
    a charter school that will serve grades 9-12. It will
      have a college prep curriculum with an emphasis on careers in health
      and medical fields as part of its partnership with the University of
      Illinois at Chicago. The school will open fall of 2008 on the near West
      Side near the UIC campus. The Noble Network of Charter Schools currently
      operates five schools throughout the city.

—more—

  • Noble Street Charter School
      Comer
    Campus, a charter school that will serve grades 9-12.
      It will have a college prep curriculum and have a partnership with Gary
      Comer Youth Center. The school will open fall of 2008 in the Greater
      Grand Crossing neighborhood. The Noble Network of Charter Schools currently
      operates five schools throughout the city.

  • Amandla Charter School,
      a charter school that will serve grades 5-12, with a college prep curriculum
      starting at the middle school level. Founded by several CPS teachers,
      including a Building Excellent Schools Fellow, this school will share
      space with Parker Elementary, 6800 S. Stewart. The school will begin
      accepting fifth-graders in 2008.

  • Perspectives Chicago Lawn,
      a charter school that will serve grades 6-12. Its culture and curriculum
      will reflect the Perspectives philosophy,
    “A Disciplined Life.” The school will open fall of 2008. Currently,
      Perspectives Charter School operates four charter schools across the
      city.

  • Perspectives Math and Science
      Academy
    , a charter school that will serve grades 6-12 and similarly
      reflect the Perspectives philosophy,
    “A Disciplined Life,” with a math and science focus. The school, partnering
      with the Illinois Institute of Technology, will open fall of 2008 at
      300 W. Pershing. Currently, Perspectives Charter School operates four
      charter schools across the city.

  • University of Chicago,
      a charter school that will serve grades 6-8, with a college prep curriculum
      and a mission to strengthen the community through research, leadership
      and service. The school will also serve as a professional development
      site for teachers, principals and support staff, and will open fall
      of 2008 at Woodson South Elementary, 4444 S. Evans. Currently, University
      of Chicago operates three charter school campuses across the city.

  • The Academy for Global
      Citizenship
    , a contract school serving grades K-8, will incorporate
      the curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program
      and focus on global citizenship. The school will open fall of 2008 at
      4101 W 51st St.

  • LEARN
      Charter School West Garfield Park
    , a charter school that will serve
      grades K-8. Its curriculum will focus on preparing students to be contributing
      citizens of tomorrow in a safe, nurturing environment today. The school
      will open fall of 2008 at a yet to be determined location in West Garfield
      Park. Currently, LEARN operates an elementary charter school in North
      Lawndale.

  • Chicago International Charter
      School-Friesse
    , a charter school that will serve grades K-3. It
      will have an innovative and rigorous curriculum. The school will open
      fall of 2008 at 9535 S. Throop.

  • Disney II, a performance
      school that will serve grades K-8. Its curriculum will be modeled after
      Disney Magnet School, an elementary school located on the North Side,
      and will incorporate many of the same successful instructional practices.
      Disney II is one of two franchised elementary schools that will open
      fall of 2008 at a location yet to be determined.
     

    —more—

  • Burroughs II, a performance
      school that will serve grades K-8. Its curriculum will be modeled after
      the curriculum at Burroughs Elementary, a neighborhood school on the
      Southwest Side, and incorporate many of the same successful instructional
      practices. Burroughs II is one of two franchised elementary schools
      that will open fall of 2008 at a location yet to be identified.

  • American Quality Schools
      (AQS) Plato Learning Academy
    , a contract school that will serve
      grades K-8. Its curriculum will incorporate a mission and belief that
      every child has the innate capacity to achieve success through high
      academic and personal standards, competent and caring faculty and staff,
      and involved and caring parents. AQS Plato will open fall 2008 in the
      Austin community.

  • Kwame Nkrumah Academy,
      a contract school that will serve grades K-5. The school takes its name
      from the first president of Ghana, Francis Nwia Nkrumah, considered
      the founder of the Pan-African movement. Its curriculum will be African-centered,
      and approach teaching and learning through the African concept
    “Ubuntu,”
      which means,
    “I am because we are” and “my humanity is expressed through your humanity.”
      The school will open fall of 2008 at 901 E. 95th St.

    The four schools approved
    by the Board for 2009 are:

  • Air Force Academy,
      a performance school that will serve students in grades 9-12. It will
      have a rigorous college prep curriculum designed to prepare students
      for post-secondary education. The Air Force Academy will open fall of
      2009 at a location yet to be identified.

  • Chicago High School for
      the Arts,
    a contract school that will serve students grades 9-12.
      A state of the art performing arts school with a comprehensive college
      prep curriculum, it will provide artistically gifted students with intensive
      pre-professional arts training. Chicago High School for the Arts will
      open fall of 2009 at a location yet to be identified.

  • LEARN
      Charter School North Lawndale II,

      a charter school that will serve grades K-8 with a curriculum similar
      to the other approved LEARN school. The school will open fall of 2009
      at a yet to be determined location in North Lawndale.

  • Hope Institute, a contract
      school that will serve students in grades K-8 with autism and developmental
      disabilities. The Hope Institute for Children and Families, based in
      Springfield, will open fall of 2009 at a location yet to be determined.

Also, six schools
were approved by the Board last November to open in fall of 2008:
 

  • UNO Charter School
      Network-Archer Heights Campus South

      will be one of two elementary school campuses at 4248 W 47th
      St. As with the North campus, the South campus also will offer effective
      direct instruction methods within a disciplined environment. The Archer
      Heights campus will open fall of 2008. 

       

—more—

  • UNO Charter School
      Network-Archer Heights Campus North
    will be one of two elementary
      school campuses at 4248 W. 47th
      St. The school will offer effective direct instruction methods within
      a disciplined environment. The Archer Heights campus will open fall
      of 2008. UNO currently runs four charter campuses in Chicago and seeks
      to relieve overcrowding while generating community involvement.

  • UNO-Archer Heights
      Campus High School
    will be United Neighborhoods Organization’s
      (UNO) first school serving students in grades 9-12. UNO will combine
      its model of direct instruction within a disciplined environment with
      high academic expectations for its students. The Archer Heights campus
      will open fall 2008 at 4248 W. 47th Street.

  • ASPIRA Rosa Parks
      Communication and Technology High School

      will be an additional charter campus and serve grades 9-12, preparing
      students for technology-based jobs. The school will offer a 4-year college
      prep math and science curriculum within the areas of computer science,
      media arts, and communications. The school also will emphasize the social,
      cultural and political climate of the surrounding community. ASPIRA
      currently operates three campuses: a traditional high school, an alternative
      dropout recovery high school, and a middle school. The Rosa Parks campus
      will open fall of 2008 at 1856 N. LeClaire.

  • ASPIRA Trade
      Tech High School
    will be an additional charter campus serving grades
      9-12 with a focus on specialized areas of the construction trades. It
      will also offer a 4-year math and science curriculum, and also emphasize
      the social, cultural, and political climate of the community. The Trade
      Tech campus is proposed for fall of 2008 at 4101 W. Ann Lurie Pl.

  • Henry Ford Power
      House Charter High School
    will serve grades 9-12 and feature a college
      prep curriculum, where students will engage in hands-on learning programs
      utilizing a wide range of local resources. Students will also have the
      opportunity to participate in structured, supervised internships with
      a variety of corporations throughout Chicago. Located at 931 S. Homan,
      the old Sears Powerhouse, the school will open fall of 2008 with 9th
      graders in the first year.

      This
past summer, CPS received 38 new school proposals submitted by teachers,
community leaders, and local and national educators through the Renaissance
2010 Request for Proposals process. After an extensive review process
involving parents, educators, elected officials, local and national
experts, community leaders and CPS staff, Duncan chose 19 proposals
to submit to the Board for approval.

      Funding
for the new schools comes in significant part from the Renaissance Schools
Fund, a private partner to the Chicago Public Schools in fundraising,
strategy and accountability for Renaissance 2010. 

       “Investments by Chicago’s business
and civic communities are helping to bring successful schoo
l models to scale,”
said Phyllis Lockett, Chief Executive Officer of the Renaissance Schools
Fund, which has raised more than $41 million in private funds for Renaissance
2010.  “Many of the schools approved today will offer innovations,
including a longer
school day, more
professional development for teachers, and programs that encourage active
parental involvement
—innovations we hope to see translated across the system.”

      —more—

      Mayor
Daley began Renaissance 2010 three years ago to create 100 new schools
by 2010, replacing low-performing schools with new educational options
in underserved communities and relieving school overcrowding in communities
experiencing rapid growth. 

      Under
Renaissance 2010, 18 new schools opened this fall, 15 new schools opened
last fall, and 22 new schools opened in the fall of 2005, for a total
of 55 schools. Also, three additional schools opened at Dodge, Williams
and Terrell in 2003 and 2004 under the original pilot program that preceded
the June 2004 start of Renaissance 2010.

      The
Chicago Public Schools is the nation’s third-largest school system. 
It includes more than 600 schools and about 409,000 students.

– 30
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  • Does it really matter how much teachers are paid? I mean, when evaluating a school, is that an important factor? Aren't average test scores, average test score gain, graduation rate, rate of violence, etc. more important by a huge factor? If I were looking for a school for my daughter, those factors would be uppermost in my mind, not the salaries of the teachers. I suppose from a social justice angle I might be concerned if I realized they were earning a pittance, but I would probably decide that was their choice and their concern.

    Private philanthropy is private. If the owner of that philanthropy wants to put it into privately funded scholarships, into Charter schools, into research into ridding the world of purple bindweed, whatever, it's her money, she can spend it where she chooses. Isn't that one of the reasons DonorChoose does well, because people get a choice? Remember, tycoons have a lot of things they can spend their money on. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, for instance, spends a lot of $$$ on malaria research--more than most nations spend on it. I say Blessings on them for that, it's a terrible disease that kills thousands every year.

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