What's wrong with Ozzie making a pile of money?

Managing a professional sports team ought not be considered a form of indentured servitude. "Loyalty" to the club ought not mean that you should stay put even though the market says you can make more money elsewhere.

So, I don't understand the criticism of Ozzie Guillen for leaving the White Sox and signing on with the Florida Marlins, because he'll get more money.

Unlike the sports sages, I don't know just how important a good manager is in general, or Ozzie Guillen in particular. He brought Chicago a World Series victory for the first time in my lifetime, and for that, he deserves credit. In my book, it is as admirable  as his describing  former  Chicago Sun-Times columnist Jay Mariotti with a "derogatory term," for which he was ordered to sensitivity training.

Also unlike many media sages, I don't consider it to be a part of my job to direct someone to be fired, whether that someone is in sports or politics. (Disclosure: As a member of the Sun-Times editorial board it was part of my job to endorse political candidates--as if I knew more than the voters, which claim I can't make.)

Those  sports columnists who had trouble with Guillen's decision to leave to advance his career and bank account should consider this: Would they have sat still if as novices  they had been permanently assigned the lowly job of doing the agate sports stats out of some sense of loyalty to the newspaper?  I sort of doubt it.

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  • My friend, the issue is that he explicitly stated his number one goal was money. He referenced big yachts, expensive clothes, etc. Such a statement is simply unbecoming of a manager, or an athlete for that matter. It undermines the (ideal) purity, and competitive spirit of sports. We like to idealistically presume that athletes/managers are in sports primarily for the intrinsic benefits. Of course he-like most of us, wants more money, and is entitled to seek out such "financial security". However it's an understatement to say that when it comes to tact and class, Ozzie left something to be desired.

  • In reply to koolking83:

    Thanks. I see: It's all right to want a lot of money as long as you're classy about it.

  • Nothing wrong. Just glad no more of his blather and self-referential posturing. Take our manager. Please. Our general manager too if yr interested.

  • From reports, he isn't going to get that much more money. Reports vary between $2.5 million to $4 million, but closer to the $2.5. Apparently it was $2 million here.

    The problem was the posturing. We shouldn't have to put up with two years of the family feud with Kenny, including 3 months of moaning until he finally got his release.

    When leaving Chicago, he was saying what great guys Jerry and Kenny were, and that Chicago was his and his family's home, and then one day later in Miami said that he was at home and his family wanted to move there for three years.

    In that it is obvious that this was all prearranged,* and Jerry didn't just call Ozzie into his office at 1:30 Monday to say he could have his release; basically the objection is to all the b.s. If Ozzie wants out, fine, but keep the tantrums to yourself, Oz. In the meantime Wilmer Valderrama, now wearing a goatee, can play Ozzie in Chicago if he wants.

    _______
    *i.e., it being said that Ozzie was free to sign anywhere, but we knew what two players Florida was sending, Kenny saying that the search had been on, and the "reports have it" that the Marlins were going to announce the hiring at 1 EST, like they hadn't sent out a press release first.

  • In reply to jack:

    Points well taken. The guy did prove to be classless and, by extension, an insult to his team, the organization and the town.

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