More power to the CTA Red and Brown lines

An upgrade to three power substations will improve service and reliability for riders on the CTA's Red and Brown lines.

The CTA last week  approved the $25.6 million contract to upgrade existing electrical equipment and buildings at Princeton substation on West 63rd Street, the State Street substation in the Loop and the Kimball substation at the Brown Line terminal. The project also will increase the electrical power capacity at both State and Kimball by 20 percent.

The work by Clark Construction Group will replace aging equipment and allow the CTA to increase power at key areas. The project will rehabilitate electrical systems and replace AC/DC conversion equipment, new cables and switches as well as perform masonry work, install new roofs, doors and floors to weather proof the substations, the CTA said in a news release.

The $25.6 million will cover both design and construction. Clark is expected to start in the spring of 2014 and finish by the end of 2015. The money comes from the CTA capital budget.

Meanwhile, work continues on construction of three new power substations at Farwell and Armitage for the Red and Brown lines. That $66.5 million project is expected to be completed by the end of 2014.

Monday was a big day at the Farwell substation as crews poured concrete. MaryAnne Lyons, the writer of the blog How to Build a Substation, has a bird's eye view of the construction. Check out the photos and the well-documented construction process.

On Sunday, the Farwell substation awaits the concrete pour. (Photo by How to Build a Substation)

On Sunday, the Farwell substation awaits the concrete pour. (Photo by MaryAnne Lyons from How to Build a Substation)

After Monday's concrete pour at the Farwell substation, workers smooth the cement. (Photos by How to Build a Substation)

After Monday's concrete pour at the Farwell substation, workers smooth the cement. (Photo by MaryAnne Lyons from How to Build a Substation)

 

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  • Also, despite the project to upgrade the Englewood branch for the Red Line, a derailment last night.

  • That's a strange post...what does a "slight" train derailment have to do with construction and updating of the CTA's power substations?

  • I'm sure all that extra power at Farwell will help the trains move faster through the Granville crossovers. Not!

  • In reply to ScooterLibbby:

    Which was my point. However many millions they spend on fixing stuff, they don't fix it to the extent that the line affords performance that meets service standards.

  • In reply to jack:

    This event has nothing to do with what you call "fixing stuff." Repairs, rehabs, reconstructions all have definite goals. My question to you based on your statement was, "What relationship does a 'minor derailment" have to do with power substation rehab/construction?" More to the point...do you, Jack, know any details about the derailment...was it the front of the train, mid-train, the rear cars? Was it a track problem, a switch problem, a car borne problem. Did any equipment malfunction? Was it an operator error? Was there any other personnel error? Was the track gauge or wheel gauge out of alignment? Were there any parts worn? Was there a malfunction of switch controls? Was there signal failure?

    I have to admit that 90 percent of the time your posts are to the point, accurate, and factual.....but not this time. I think you'll agree you spoke a little too quick. These two events are not related.

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