Miguel del Valle on public transit

I found links to these public transit position statements on Miguel del Valle's website.

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All new public transit facilities and programs must be accessible under the ADA. Considerable renovation to train stations need to occur on the Blue and Red lines in particular. Door to door services are not operated by the CTA, but my administration would work with PACE to improve services.

Del Valle does not support increasing the city subsidy of the CTA: Chicago must seek additional federal and regional resources and other creative revenue-generating opportunities to support our public transit system.

Ranking CTA expansion plans:
1. Red Line south to 130th Street
2. Orange Line to the Ford City Mall
NO Downtown Circulator
3. Downtown-O'Hare Express

We must seek additional federal and regional resources and other
creative revenue-generating opportunities to support our public transit
system. In addition to the obvious issue of getting more funding to
expand services, I propose three solutions that will allow us to make
best use of our current resources.
 

  • Ensure that current services operate during the third shift and on
    weekends, connecting our working communities to job centers throughout
    Chicago and the suburbs. This can be done by shifting current resources
    to cover these shifts, which will increase ridership and system revenue,
    and at the same time, reduce service during less utilized times of the
    day or week.
  • Improve how Metra and Pace services connect with CTA services during
    key work shifts throughout the week and weekend. Metra stops need to be
    available to key communities. Pace should be serving the disabled
    community, among other things, to connect to jobs.
  • Develop a universal fare card, so that residents can transfer easily
    from CTA to Metra or to Pace to jobs across and outside of Chicago. This
    fare card must be reloadable at any CTA stop (or Metra or Pace) with
    cash for residents who don't have bank accounts or through electronic
    bank transfer for workers who have a bank account.

Of the expansion plans that have been discussed recently, the extension
of the Red Line to 130th Street is of the highest priority.

Expanding access to transit and travel options to lessen reliance on
automobiles. We must aggressively advocate for local, regional, state,
and federal plans and funding to increase public transportation and make
Chicago a more bicycle and pedestrian friendly city. Transportation is
the second largest contributor of greenhouse gas in the city. And
transportation is the second largest expense for most households, right
after housing.

I support bus rapid transit initiatives in the City of Chicago. I also
support our "New Start" Federal Transit Administration projects, such as
the Red Line to expand transit options for residents on the South Side
of Chicago. There are many other projects that I believe can expand
ridership in our great city. I commend the CTA for their leadership in
acquiring federal dollars to reduce greenhouse gases released from
transit buses.

We must aggressively advocate for local, regional, state, and federal
plans and funding to increase public transportation and make Chicago
friendlier to bicycles and pedestrians. Transportation is Chicago's
second largest contributor of greenhouse gas emissions. In parallel,
transportation is the second largest expense for most households, right
after housing. Although 1.6 million people use the city's bus and rail
system each weekday, millions more continue to drive because we fail to
enact policies that would make transit the cheapest and most convenient
option for most trips.

A first step is to ensure we are not leaving any federal transportation
money on the table through negligence or lack of foresight. An estimated
$385 billion in federal, state, and local funds will be available for
regional transportation investments over the next 30 years. Chicago
should seek a larger share of existing transportation funding by
effectively advocating for a fair distribution of state money. The
Chicago area gets 45% and downstate gets 55% even though the Chicago
region represents 70% of the state's population and 78% of the state's
economy. Contrary to our goals of sustainability, our state allocations
of transportation funds focus too much on roads over other more
sustainable forms of transportation. In addition, a study on federal
stimulus spending by the Center for Neighborhood Technology and others
showed that nationwide spending on transit created twice as many jobs as
spending on roads.

Another area of imbalance is the Regional Transportation Authority
(RTA); we are not getting our fair share of funding. 82% of Chicago-area
transit riders use the CTA, but it only receives 59% of operating
subsidies from the RTA. On the other hand, METRA gets only 12% of the
area's riders, but receives 27% of the funding. My administration will
advocate for changes in these allocations.

Comments

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  • On the RTA, again s.o.s.* Instead of crying that he isn't bleeding the suburbs enough, how about real reform, like abolishing all 4 transit agencies. For instance, he seems to be the only one so far who recognizes Pace and Metra, but not the real problem--fractured transit governance.

    *I don't mean save our ship.

  • How is the mayor of Chicago supposed to abolish all four transit agencies? I agree we need a real RTA, not these four boards, but I don't see how the mayor can accomplish that all on his own.

  • In reply to Cheryl:

    The same way all five say that they can increase transit funding "all on their own." They all promise that, but obviously can't do it.

    Instead, one of them stands up and says "I recognize that the Daleys used transit as their private political fiefdom and that was wrong. Instead, I am proposing a better vision of transit governance to the legislature, and I hope to get the state behind it."

    Heck, Rahm proposes a service tax, but it is pretty well accepted that under Article VII, Section 6(e)(2), legislative approval would be needed, because sales taxes are denoted as Retailer Occupation Tax. That didn't stop Rahm from proposing it.

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