No extra transfer fee from bus to train

A couple of commenters here this week said it would cost more under the new budget to transfer from a bus to a train to make up for the proposed 50 cent difference in fare between buses (a proposed $2.50) and trains ($3).

One person said it costs more now.

Just for the record, that's hogwash. I thought it was bull the first time I read it, but I did confirm it with the CTA. Right now, and under any new budget, it will cost 25 cents to transfer from bus to train or train to bus. Got it?

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  • I find it funny that it will be cheaper for me to take a bus and a train than just a bus. If I am not in a rush I should just go wave my card on a bus that is in front of the train station and than go and get on the train.

  • Verno, just to clarify, I think you mean it will be cheaper to take a bus and train than just a TRAIN (not bus). Interesting concept to wave your card at the bus reader ($2.50) and then get on the train (25 cents transfer). Total cost would be $2.75 instead of $3.

  • In reply to KevinO’Neil:

    I'm sure the CTA brass hasn't thought this through, but this could be a "win win" situation. Waiving the pass on the bus results in another unlinked trip. The Ridership Report goes up and the subsidy per ride goes down, justifying (in their minds) more funding. Of course, the person trying this might have to wait while 3 trains pass for a bus to show.

  • In reply to KevinO’Neil:

    I just think it's stunningly idiotic for them to reject that much money in the face of this (well, every) funding crisis. A buck ain't a burden.

  • In reply to KevinO’Neil:

    Actually, now that I think of it, that might be the way to wedge a little money out of the seniors, too -- make all transfers a buck, even for them.

  • In reply to BobS:

    I'm not sure how that would work. Each would be an "unlinked trip," and the senior passenger could claim that he or she just started an original trip. There isn't the incentive to claim a transfer to knock down a second $2.25 ride down to $.25.

  • In reply to jack:

    Are seniors just waved on? (I look older than I am, so this isn't just rhetorical.) But I'd assumed they still had passes they had to use. If the first use of a pass lets 'em on for free, the second use would have no trouble debiting a buck. Even if this required tweaking the system and making changes, that costs less than the CTA would receive.

  • In reply to BobS:

    While technically possible, how does that eliminate the argument that the second ride is a new trip? Seniors are entitled to free rides (under current statutes), not a free "first ride."

  • In reply to jack:

    You're missing my point, jack; I was suggesting the law could be amended to provide only for a free first ride.

  • In reply to jack:

    Just as it is now - if you have to take a train then the bus, you pay more than those who can transfer bus to train or train to bus.
    I suppose the concept is it equalizes (because you pay less coming back) but still peeves me, especially when I am only going one direction (e.g. getting a ride home, or continuing on in another direction from there later).

  • I just noticed it on the ride back on the red line. Those notices for public comments about the budget says that transfer fees are being eliminated (for regular fees, reduced fee still pays $0.15 for a transfer)

    May be wrong, but it's not uninformed bull

  • Sargas, this CTA press release says "Current transfer fees and policies will stay the same."

    That means 25 cents for two transfers from either bus or train to bus or train.

  • In reply to KevinO’Neil:

    Never disagreed with that, I just thought that the notices in the trains had said there was no transfer fee.

    I looked today and it just says "No Change", so probably I just misread things last night. Sorry for the confusion.

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