New CTA survey seeks comments on service, rider experience

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A new survey featured prominently on the CTA home page asks riders about their bus and rail experiences and how they could be better. It also looks for comments on the 80%-20% split on the gasoline tax for highway-public transit funding, and for thoughts on capital spending.

The latter two issues are like preaching to the choir. But that's OK. It's good to see new CTA President Richard Rodriguez engaging his customers about the service they get and how it might be improved.

In my interview with Rodriguez last week, as well as a City Club speech, he said one of his top priorities is
to bring a stronger customer focus to everything the CTA does. And as new president, he wanted to reach out to customers directly through this survey.

The survey will be up for two weeks. While the CTA has done Web surveys in the past on specific topics, this is the first general CTA survey posted on the Web site. (Here's a direct link to the survey.)

A small suggestion to the CTA market research department: How about an indicator on each page about the progress you're making as you move through each page of the survey? We've come to expect that now with online surveys.

Filed under: CTA in the news

Tags: CTA survey

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  • You coded the direct link as email rather than a web link.

    But, as I previously said, I doubt that Daley appointee number 5 or 6 to the CTA presidency really cares what we think, so long as it isn't support for a campaign for more funding. Just as I don't believe that a retread at Streets and Sanitation much cares about motorist feedback, until the time things again become intolerable.

  • The CTA does not care about the customers at all. The buses are always late. The fares are always high. the bus drivers are always rude. It always a one track on the weekends. It always something. Bus breakdown. The trains always stopping for equipment failing. $2.25 every time your ride the bus or train. Cta is not getting any better. Its getting worse. The more money the CTA get the worse the company.

  • How about you guys get rid of the free ride for seniors. We all know it was a political move by Blogo to get the senior vote. I am a senior that can afford to pay a reduced fare. To be brutal, to be Frank, this is like the big shot son borrowing money to take his father out to Joey's Brickhouse (gotta get a plug in). Makes no sense.

  • I fixed the direct link. Thanks Jack. And it sounds like you should take that survey, quja38.

  • Clicked that, but it turns out that if you click the "wrong answer" to one of the preliminary questions, it kicks you out and thanks you for participating.

  • Why isn't there a massive public works project to expand the CTA into all the neighborhoods of Chicago? I find it hard to believe I can't take a subway from Lakeview to Humbolt Park. It's time to integrate Chicago: subway line by subway line, bus by bus. To hell with the magic bean in Millennium Park, it's a vanity project like the Olympic Games. What Chicago needs is a new Mayor, one without a famous last name who's dedicated to extending public transportation. A thankless job now, but a gift to the future of Chicago.

  • In reply to GregMorelli:

    From Chicago-l.org :

    "The Humboldt Park's main problem was its out-of-the-way terminal at Lawndale, a location with no significant ridership generator. Had the branch been extended as planned, at least to the commercial corridors at Pulaski and Kostner less than a mile west, its ridership and prominence may have been able to reach higher levels. ... Another fundamental problem with the Humboldt was that it was just a half block north of the busy streetcar line on North Avenue, and the "L"TM line was not terribly competitive with the carline from a frequency of service standpoint. ... The CTA

  • In reply to GregMorelli:

    It didn't like my answer to the first question and promptly kicked me out. Way to get opinions directly from your customers, CTA.

    I'll just have to keep posting my opinions here instead.

  • In reply to GregMorelli:

    The survey is biased.It is longer or shorter depending on the answers you give.This is a civil rights violation lawsuit waiting to happen.

  • In reply to JamesReyes:

    It would be only if the first question was your race, sex, or ethnicity.

    But since I noted the same thing before you did, I wonder who the CTA is really trying to survey and thus whether the results could be valid. The probably have it down to only the butt kissers are left at the end.

  • In reply to JamesReyes:

    I personally think you're all being a little too hard on the CTA for screening out certain potential respondents.

    First, it's very common to not allow those in marketing or market research to take surveys. And it's common practice not to let employees or business partners to take your own survey.

    So that leaves those in advertising in PR being shut out. And it's not terribly uncommon to screen out folks in those fields. I say let's give them the benefit of the doubt and credit for actually asking.

    In general I graded them higher on bus service -- bus tracker, newer buses -- and lower on rail service -- inaudible announcements, terrible station houses and platforms.

  • In reply to KevinO’Neil:

    Playing with it, apparently they didn't want anyone who rode less than once a week, either. Therefore, not obtaining the feedback of people who are casual users or who were turned off from using it. Hence my gluteal osculation point.

  • In reply to JamesReyes:

    This was a very narrow survey, excluding all long-range and infrastructure decisions. This is what I wrote in the extra comments:
    1) CTA should complete its bus rapid transit plans and implement a citywide system as soon as possible.
    2) CTA should more aggressively lower its own environmental impact by switching to hybrid buses and looking for other innovative green improvements.
    3) CTA should make transit-oriented development a top priority, especially near the many Green Line stations with major untapped potential.
    4) CTA should add infill stations on the Yellow Line and Green Line (and not just in the rich areas, but at Damen and Western too).
    5) CTA should abandon plans for the Ashland Circle Line corridor and instead build a new El line on the Crosstown Expressway route paralleling Cicero from the O'Hare Blue Line to Midway and then east to the Red Line.

  • In reply to GregMorelli:

    Why isn't there a massive public works project to expand the CTA into all the neighborhoods of Chicago?

    The short answer is that too many people live in the suburbs and the price of gas is too low. This isn't a problem with the mayor (altho his airport express fantasies and the like haven't helped). Daley doesn't have access to revenues that could even start to expand the El into the system it should be. Until transit is an urgent priority for a much larger share of the American population, national politicians are not going to make the money needed for world-class transit available to cities like Chicago.

    That said, CTA isn't doing a bad job of planning for that day. The alternatives analyses for the Red, Orange, and Yellow Line extensions are complete, and we just need local politicians to come thru with the funding in the next federal transportation bill. After those, we should build the Crosstown El (aka Mid-City Transitway, paralleling Cicero between the O'Hare Blue Line and Midway, then cutting east to the Red Line at 87th). After that we should seriously consider a subway under Western, which would fundamentally change the character of the city and make it much easier for many people to get rid of their cars.

  • In reply to razetheladder:

    "The alternatives analyses for the Red, Orange, and Yellow Line extensions are complete, and we just need local politicians to come thru with the funding in the next federal transportation bill. After those, we should build the Crosstown El (aka Mid-City Transitway, paralleling Cicero between the O'Hare Blue Line and Midway, then cutting east to the Red Line at 87th). After that we should seriously consider a subway under Western, which would fundamentally change the character of the city and make it much easier for many people to get rid of their cars."

    Amen to that. I live in one of the neighborhoods that would be transformed--made real city neighborhoods in a way that a European might recognize--by a Western subway. I probably won't live to see it, but hope my children do.

    R.A. Stewart, the quondam Quondam El Rat

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    Hahaha...I like to call the wonderful CTA busses, THE ROLLING PORCH. IT's so sickeing all the time. Disgusting crack heads, drunks and ext. These dumb assholes that ride the "Rolling Porch"I love seeing and is so amued and, I wonder how many times some bum has pissed or shit themselves while nodding in and out in a seat that I may sit in later. Or when you see the crack head mom with burn markings on her lips, nodding in and out while their 2 year old just wants love and attention from her, but she's too messed up to do anything about it. AND last but not least, having to hear that crazy black lady blame everything on the white man, These are the enjoyable, unforgettable experiences you can have of your very own on the rolling porch!! Enjoy!!

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    Whoa, watching on the news right now...some woman got shot on the CTA bus...go figure.

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