Chicago State University Students Tackle Nielsen

Chicago State University Students Tackle Nielsen


Picture Courtesy of CSU Media Department

For CSU students, Nielsen knowledge is power
Students absorb powerful social, economic and political lessons of Nielsen’s
“The State of the African-­American Consumer Report” and display their analytical acumen
Feb. 28, 2012 — Armed with facts and rewarded with prizes, two teams of Chicago State students competed to demonstrate their knowledge of Black consumer trends at Nielsen’s event to introduce “The State of the African-­‐American Consumer Report” in the New Academic Library auditorium.
“Nine times out of 10, we don’t look at what we spend our money on and what it constitutes for us as African-­‐Americans,” said CSU Sophomore Candice Adley, 22, who is studying Spanish and plans to attend medical school. “It’s beautiful to know we have this power to empower ourselves.”
Nearly 60 students learned facts contained in Nielsen’s first-­‐ever ethnic consumer report that illuminates the economic power of African-­‐Americans. Two teams of three faced-­‐off “Family Feud” style to win iPod Nanos and other prizes. According to the report, the nearly $1 trillion African-­‐Americans’ spend annually would make this ethnic group the 16th largest country in the world, said Cheryl Pearson-­‐McNeil, Nielsen’s senior vice president, public affairs and government relations.
“We’re spending money on these products and somebody’s benefitting from them,” said Pearson-­‐McNeil, urging African-­‐American females, who are emerging as heads of household, to be empowered. “Take time to be smart consumers for yourself and your families.”
Exposing CSU students to knowledge about the power of their choices is part of the learning experience that helps coeds learn critical thinking skills, said Angela Henderson, CSU’s vice president of enrollment management.
“As freshly minted professionals,” Henderson said, “our students will be in a position to make critical decisions about managing their finances and the products and services they provide.”
Report highlights include:
The percentage of African-­‐Americans attending college or earning a degree has increased to 45% for men and 53% for women (adults 25+).
African-­‐Americans use more than double the amount of mobile phone voice minutes compared to whites — 1,298 minutes a month vs. 606.
The number of African-­‐American households earning $75,000 or higher grew by almost 64%, a rate close to 12% greater than the change in the overall population’s earnings between 2000 and 2009.
The average African-­‐American household spends about seven hours, 12 minutes daily watching TV — 40% more viewing time spent than the overall population.
12.5 million African-­‐American households helped make Super Bowl XLV, the most-­‐ watched Super Bowl ever.
African-­‐Americans are 30% more likely to visit Twitter. ###

To access the full report http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports-downloads/2011/state-of-the-african-american-consumer.html

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