20 Most Useless Majors?

20 Most Useless Majors?

 

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But these look like so much fun! (SOURCE: http://www.tdbimg.com/files/2011/04/27/img-hp-main---useless-degrees_002647795740.jpg)

by Karis Hustad, Sophomore, Loyola University

As a journalism major, I'm pretty used to people snickering at my job prospects.

"Journalism?!  Its dead!  You'll never find a job!" say the people with successful futures who laugh as they take out their calculators to continue on their finance homework.  Usually I just sigh, and rationalize that they just don't know the industry and that I will be the one to break through the brick wall that is the communications job market. 

However, the Daily Beast's list of the 20 most useless majors still felt a little harsh. 

The list, which compiles numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Statistics and PayScale, compiled the list based on starting and mid-career pay, expected change in the total number of jobs from 2008-2018 and expected percentage change in available jobs from 2008-2018. 

Naturally journalism reigns at number one, which I'm a little peeved about.  Yes, Daily Beast, I understand the reality of the situation, but can't you let me hold onto my youthful idealism for a little longer?

However, outside journalism and the other usual "laughable-job-market" subjects (english, art, fashion design, music), I was surprised to see some less obvious majors also on the list.  Chemistry?  Human resources?  Psychology?  Aren't those supposed to be guaranteed job fields?

It certainly can be said that the job market is smaller than it has been in past years, which affects all college graduates attempting to find a job, regardless of major.  But it kind of scares me that nowadays even so-called "secure" majors are even considered risky.  What does this say about the value of college education?  What does this say about the subjects we push students toward, that supposedly guarantee employment?

And most importantly, what does this mean for me?  Heading full speed toward a diploma with a degree in "NO-JOB"?

Of course we could all take this article as the straw that broke the camel's back.  Its finals week, and the combined stress of 20,394 tests/papers (approximately) with the idea that it could all just mean a fruitless job search and moving back to our parents basements after graduation is enough to make anyone crumple to the ground in utter despair. 

But for the sake of everyone's sanity, I want to point out what the numbers fail to address.  What about the school you go to?  What about the networking opportunities available?  What about the work you do outside of the classroom?  The mentors you follow?  The professors that believe in giving you more than a grade?  What about the hard work you put into the major, to gain something more than learning to meet a due date, actually taking the lessons available in the classroom and applying them to the real world?

I am a firm believer that if you are an active particpant in your major and if it is actually something you want to do, you will get a job.  It may not be your dream job at first, but it certainly can lead there.

Plus as a journalism major, I have to maintain some sense of idealism if I want to get a job.  First of all because I know if I face the reality of the situation I will change to a finance major in three seconds, but also because I know if I want to get a job in journalism I'm going to have to really want it, and that takes a belief that there is a job out there for me somewhere. 

Lists like this may be discouraging, but they aren't the full picture. 

What do you think about your job prospects?  Is your major on the list?  Do you think your major determines whether you get a job or not?  Comment and vote in the poll below!

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