November in Amber

November in Amber

Over half way through November,  already. There are still a few  leaves on the trees.  The amber-colored leaves are a beautiful contrast to the sharp blue sky.  It is as if the fall is suspended, a leaf  held by a thread of spider silk.

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris have been declared the new President and Vice-President.  The incumbent, Donald Trump,  has not conceded yet.

In the meantime, the virus  is increasing exponentially,  and more people are dying every day.  Yes,  there is encouraging news of vaccines.

I think of so many Star Trek episodes, where a plague-ridden planet awaited the delivery of a vaccine.  But 2020 is not science fiction, although there have been dystopian comparisons to 1984 and The Handmaid's Tale and the Hunger Games.

Maybe history offers a better perspective--Nero fiddling while Rome burns?

Or a  Shakespeare soliloquy before the would-be tyrant exits the stage?

We are in a climate emergency. They've run out of names for hurricanes this season. The latest one, Iota, is the strongest Atlantic hurricane this year. Iota is projected to make landfall as a Category 5 storm, in almost the same location as Hurricane Eta, just a few days ago.

It's been a windy November in Chicago, too.  I remember  the winds of November and the storms on the Great Lakes--the Edmund Fitzgerald, the iron ore ship, sunk under an iron-gray sky. You can read more about the Edmund Fitzgerald and the winds of November here.

But  today, clouds and blue sky, a wind that frees.  The bare trees are a reminder that change is the nature of things.

 

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Filed under: history, nature, seasons, weather

Tags: 2020, Iota, November

Comments

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  • WeatherNation says that there is another potential tropical storm forming in the same area Iota did. This seems to be the first year of which I am aware that multiple hurricanes hit the same place, such as SW Louisiana.

    This also reminds me of a Korean TV show with English subtitles saying that a Katrina type typhoon would wipe out Korea in 2040, but that Tampa would be hit first. It was by Irma and Eta.

  • In reply to jack:

    Thanks for stopping by, Jack--always appreciated--

    Yes! Both Eta and Iota hit the same parts of Nicaragua in less than two weeks. Never before have Cat.4 hurricanes made landfall in Central America--let alone back-to-back. Louisiana has also had multiple hurricanes this season, landfalls in almost the same place.

    I used to watch Korean TV, too! Do you remember what show that was? It's not that far-fetched to imagine such a storm, though. Look at the path of Eta.

    Hurricane season is not over, even when it's officially over on December 1.

  • In reply to Weather Girl:

    i don't know what show, and it was when Korean TV was on some low power analog station that disappeared, and then reappeared on digital 24.5 and 24.6.Not too many subtitles there, although I recognize such words as Assi Plaza,Kang's Auto Repair, Elgin Hyundai, Schaumburg, Dempster, and Pfingsten.

  • In reply to jack:

    Oh yes, the analog days. I used to watch a show I called Korean Real Antiques Show. People brought family treasures--a carved jade brush holder, or a set of cups--hundreds of years old!

  • In reply to Weather Girl:

    But did the Keno Brothers tell them how many Won the items would bring at auction?

  • In reply to jack:

    Oh yes, big money!

  • I'm reminded, WG, of what that astute weather forecaster, Yogi Berra once said: "It ain't over 'til it's over."

  • In reply to Aquinas wired:

    Did Yogi have "it went out to sea off Jacksonville?"

    WeatherNation says hurricane season is over Nov. 30, but I don't know whether to bet on that.

  • In reply to jack:

    Yes, it ends November 30. I meant that it's officially over on December 1, but there have been hurricanes after that. Maybe this year, too...

  • In reply to Aquinas wired:

    Thanks so much for stopping by, AW!
    Oh I loved Yogi-- He's right about the hurricane season, and this election, too.

  • In reply to Aquinas wired:

    Well said as ever. But when it comes to hurricanes, this year reminds me of Mr. Berra's "Nobody goes there -- it's too crowded."

  • In reply to Margaret H. Laing:

    Oh, Yogi! Is he in Bartlett's too? I just found out there are books of his sayings--including my favorite--"When you come to a fork in the road, take it"

  • In reply to Weather Girl:

    Good thinking! Yes, one quotation is attributed to Berra: "The game isn't over 'til it's over."

  • In reply to Margaret H. Laing:

    That must have been the impetus for the "starting extra innings with a man on second" rule.

  • Thank you for a lovely post, awakening eyes to the beauties of the month.

  • In reply to Margaret H. Laing:

    Thank you---much appreciated!

  • This also brings up another WeatherNation theme, that sure, it's hot in Phoenix, but not this many days over 110, and in this portion of the year not temperatures around 95.

  • You're right, Jack. It's been way warmer in the Arctic, too, for this time of year...

  • There was an interesting article in the University of Chicago Magazine about Prof. Ted Fujita, pointing out that not only did he develop the Fujita Scale, but also discovered that tornadoes have internal vortices, and microbursts, You might remember from far back that I remembered that something went through a skylight at Golf-Mill, but I didn't remember that it was a microburst.

    That issue also had a less interesting article on the origin of the meteorological program, which was later merged into the Geophysical Sciences Division (click on "Pilot Program" in the left pane or the above article).

  • In reply to jack:

    Thank you for sharing that article, Jack. Yes, Dr. Fujita contributed a lot to our understanding of tornadoes. Wind damages seem so surreal!

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