Famous Game 3s; Chicago Bulls NBA Finals Games

Famous Game 3s; Chicago Bulls NBA Finals Games

Why be upset that our Bulls aren't in the NBA Finals?  We have plenty of great memories to relive!  This is another installment in Chicago Bulls lore.

Tonight, the Heat and Mavs played a classic.  The Miami Heat were able to pull away 88-86 to take a 2-1 series lead...but does it match up with the Game 3's the Bulls participated in years back?  For some reason, Game 3's seemed to bring out the best in both squads.

Today, we look back at those great Game 3's in Chicago Bulls NBA Finals history.

1991

Chicago Bulls 104, Los Angeles Lakers 96 (OT) (Chicago leads series 2-1)

Out of the 35 NBA Finals games the Bulls have played, Game 3 of the '91 Finals is in the top five.  The Lakers had won Game 1 on a Sam Perkins three-pointer, and the Bulls rallied back to thump the Lakers in Game 2.  The Bulls went to Los Angeles' Great Western Forum, a place where the Lakers had dominated throughout the 80's, looking to steal one on the road.

The fourth quarter went back and forth; featuring a sweet driving three-point play by Vlade Divac (who finished with 24) and a game-tying jumper by Michael Jordan in the waning seconds.  Jordan would finish with 29 points, 9 boards, and 9 assists.

In the overtime period, the Bulls pulled away to take a 2-1 series lead.

1992

Chicago Bulls 94, Portland Trail Blazers 84 (Chicago leads series 2-1)

The Bulls had blown a late lead in Game 2 that would've given them a 2-0 series lead.  With the Rose Garden crowd, notoriously one of the best in the league, the Blazers tried to take a hold on the series.

The Bulls played a stifling defensive game that would be a trademark in their games after a playoff loss.  The Bulls held Portland to 36% from the field.  The Bulls were 9-2 in NBA Finals games after a loss.

1993

Phoenix Suns 129, Chicago Bulls 121 (3OT) (Chicago leads series 2-1)

Game 3 of the 1993 NBA Finals is considered one of the greatest Finals games in NBA history.  The Bulls had shown the Suns what it took to play in the Finals by stealing the first two games in Phoenix.  When the Suns showed up in Chicago, many in the Windy City were already preparing for the parade route...little did they know about the feisty Suns.

Dan Majerle hit six huge three-points and Charles Barkley gathered 19 boards to offset a stellar 44 point performance from Michael Jordan.

As the game moved on, Scottie Pippen got cramps...and it affected him massively in overtime prompting a hideous shooting performance going 13 of 35 from the field.

1996

Chicago Bulls 108, Seattle SuperSonics 86 (Chicago leads series 3-0)

The first half of Game 3 of the 1996 NBA Finals may have been the most dominating show of any Bulls team. 

The Sonics were enjoying their first NBA Finals game since 1979.  They brought in their mascot from above the scoreboard to center court via a large rope...fireworks...ridiculous P.A. boasting...then the Bulls proceeded to beat the living hell out of Seattle en route to a 62-38 halftime lead.

The near perfect performance was the writing on the wall for Seattle.  A fourth championship would come on Father's Day.

1997

Utah Jazz 104, Chicago Bulls 93 (Chicago leads series 2-1)

After watching the Bulls take the first two games at home, the Utah Jazz returned home for their first NBA Finals game in franchise history.

The Bulls found themselves in the midst of a Mormon meltdown.  Karl Malone would lite up the Bulls for 37 points and bring the Jazz back into the series.

1998

Chicago Bulls 96, Utah Jazz 54 (Chicago leads series 2-1)

The Bulls needed to make a statement.  Statement made.

The Jazz set an NBA Finals record for least amount of points scored, and the Bulls set a record for the biggest blowout in NBA Finals history.  The Jazz were caught like a deer in headlights.  No other game in Bulls playoff history looked this easy.

The anemic Jazz shot 30% from the field, were 1 of 9 behind the arc, and turned the ball over 26 times.  Only one Jazz played (Karl Malone) scored over eight points.  Eight.

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