Charlie Sheen and Sammy Sosa Have Something In Common: Steriods

Charlie Sheen and Sammy Sosa Have Something In Common:  Steriods

 

Charlie Sheen just doesn't seem to go away.  Love him or hate him, Sheen has captured the attention of America in quite the same manner of a derailed train.  Since going bat-you-know-what crazy, Sheen has been 2011's answer to tabloid cravings and an idol to the millions of Americans destined to be douchebags.

Meanwhile, Sammy Sosa has managed to stay away from mainstream media—or rather, mainstream media has avoided Sosa like a Dominican plague—outside of the recent sightings of Sosa whooping it up in Miami during the Bulls/Heat Eastern Conference Finals series.

This week, however, we've learned that—outside of a deep infatuation with themselves, an almost-sick lust for the limelight, and wardrobes that rival the most vile personalities in the porn industry—Sheen and Sosa share another characteristic:  they've both used steroids.

According to a recent "Where Are They Now" issue of Sports Illustrated, Sheen took steroids during the filming of "Major League" to improve the performance of his fictional character, Rick "Wild Thing" Vaughn.

"Let's just say that I was enhancing my performance a little bit," says Sheen. "It was the only time I ever did steroids. I did them for like six or eight weeks. You can print this, I don't give a f—. My fastball went from 79 to like 85."

I guess those radar guns in the film were not as accurate as we all believed after all.

Also of note, Sheen supposedly suffered from a little "Roid Rage" while engaging in the enhancement of his performance, citing a bit of short fuse in regard to the look he had to undertake for the role.

"I didn't like the haircut because it generated so many comments in bars. I've got enough of that already," says Sheen. "Add that to the mix, and it's a recipe for a fistfight."

As for Sosa, well, he's still Chicago's most-beloved PED abuser, and like Sheen's character, sported quite possibly the most colorful haircut in Chicago sports history.

I suppose the two have more in common than I originally thought.

 

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