Posts tagged "Census"

Nearly 1.9 million Illinois residents live in poverty

Nearly 1.9 million Illinois residents live in poverty
Fifteen percent of Illinois families lived in poverty in 2011. That’s according to new data released by the Census Bureau today from the 2011 American Community Survey. It’s nearly 150,000 more people living in poverty than in 2010. Illinois is one of 17 states where poverty rates increased, and the third year in a row... Read more »

Race, poverty and politics: Chicagoland foreclosures spike; public grumbing over River Point TIF; Quinn says pension costs could surpass state's education spending

Chicago-area foreclosures in July were 37 per cent higher than they were a year ago. Citing RealtyTrac data released Thursday, The Chicago Tribune reported that 11,885 homes in Cook, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, McHenry and Will counties were in some stage of foreclosure last month: 5,374 entered the foreclosure process; 3,274 were scheduled for a... Read more »

Asian Americans push for greater political clout in Illinois, nationally

Asian Americans push for greater political clout in Illinois, nationally
It’s high time the Asian American community had a stronger political voice, locally and nationally, said a number of advocates working to make the group more politically significant this election cycle. During a news conference call early this week, a national pollster and several activists discussed the results of national and statewide polls that indicate... Read more »
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The end of the segregated century?

Last week, the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research created a buzz when it released a report that suggests that Chicago–along with communities across the nation–is less segregated today than it was a decade ago. While “Ghetto neighborhoods persist,” the conservative think-tank wrote, “most are in decline.” When I drive through the Near North Side, it... Read more »

How segregated is this city? Chicago speaks

A recent study of segregation in Chicago by the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, based on census data, found that while Chicago still has the dubious honor of being the most segregated major city in America, it also experienced one of the sharpest declines in spacial segregation. What do you think? We asked some Chicagoans... Read more »

2011's must-read story on poverty

Poverty has become a statistic. An alarming statistic, an oft-quoted statistic. We know that one in six Americans are now poor. And while that’s shocking, it’s not as shocking as the stories those Americans have to tell. This morning, I read one of the most profound pieces on American poverty after the Great Recession, put... Read more »
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Mancession? Women still bear the brunt of U.S. poverty

Mancession? Women still bear the brunt of U.S. poverty
While many have called this decade’s economic downturn a “mancession,” because of how men have been hit by the crisis, women and children are still bearing the brunt of the nation’s poverty problem, census data show. The poverty rate among women was 14.5 percent in 2010, up from 13.9 percent in 2009. Like the nation’s... Read more »

Latinos' share of population rising

Census data from last year’s count is bringing into focus a demographic commonality the State of Illinois, Cook County and the City of Chicago increasingly share: the steady growth of the Latino community, both adults and children. Data released by the U.S. Census Bureau earlier this month show that statewide more than 23 percent of... Read more »

In Chicago, even wealthy black families live in poor neighborhoods

Unlike the Jeffersons, affluent minority families aren’t always “movin’ on up.” A new study of recently released census data shows that wealthy black and Hispanic families often live alongside much poorer neighbors. White families in Chicago making more than $75,000 a year live in neighborhoods where only 7.6 percent of their neighbors make considerably less... Read more »
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Counting the invisible man: finding black men for the census

It’s hard to count what you can’t see, and in the last census, black men went unseen and uncounted. In the 2000 U.S. Census, black men were undercounted at a rate of 7.67 percent. That might not sound so high, until you realize that white men were undercounted by .29 percent and black women at... Read more »