Posts tagged ""Abusing the badge""

Barber Shop Show preview: Police misconduct on Chicago's streets

Note: This week’s regularly scheduled Barber Shop Show has been cancelled. In its place, we’re re-airing a show from May about Angela Caputo’s investigation, Abusing the Badge. We’ll be live again next week from Carter’s Barber Shop in North Lawndale. There’s a small, but costly, group of Chicago police officers working on the city’s streets... Read more »

Police misconduct cases drag on, and on

With the number of police misconduct allegations holding steady at about 2,800 per year, and the watchdog brought on to investigate them taking years to decide if there is even merit to the claims, is the system working? That’s a question the Chicago Tribune posed yesterday in an article that suggests growing tension over the... Read more »

Join us Friday at the launch party for our "Policing the Police" issue

$110 million dollars. That’s how much the City of Chicago has paid in police misconduct lawsuits and legal fees in the past two years. In this month’s issue of The Chicago Reporter, reporter Angela Caputo dug through hundreds of lawsuits to unearth the 140 officers that were named in multiple misconduct cases. Of the 140... Read more »
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Chicago spent over $63 million defending police misconduct: study

Chicago spent over $63 million defending police misconduct: study
“Pinstripe patronage” is what the People’s Law Office is calling it. The Chicago law firm that’s known for bringing cases of police brutality, false arrest and wrongful convictions wanted to find out just how much the city was paying to outside firms to defend police officers accused of misconduct. After obtaining records with a Freedom... Read more »

How much does race, stress play into Chicago police misconduct?

How deep does misconduct run in the Chicago Police Department? Is race a factor? Do officers themselves ever feel they’ve been targeted by abusive cops? I wasn’t expecting straight answers when I cold-called Officer Richard Wooten on his cell phone. Getting a police officer to talk about misconduct among his peers seemed like a long... Read more »