What's Up This Week: Protest of Salvation Army feeding restriction, last school-closing meeting and a look at restaurant workers' plight

What's Up This Week: Protest of Salvation Army feeding restriction, last school-closing meeting and a look at restaurant workers' plight

Food Center Uprooted. The Uptown Salvation Army has one month to find a new home where it can continue to feed low-income Chicagoans, after Alderman James Cappleman told the charity it could no longer serve from his ward, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. The move has angered some residents, who will protest outside his office on Wednesday.

Final School Closing Meeting. The last chance for parents and community members to tell Chicago Public Schools their opinion on the planned school closing is Monday. The community hearing for the Pilsen-Little Village school network will finish more than a month of hearings all across the city.

Behind the Kitchen Door. Restaurant workers not only earn low wages, but work in some of the harshest conditions. The founder of the Restaurant Opportunities Center, which seeks to organize restaurant workers,  will speak Tuesday about the lives of these workers and how better work conditions would improve the meals that arrive at restaurants' tables.

Radical Slavery. Professor Anthony Bogues will discuss what stories about slavery have not been told, and why it is important to hear those stories, in a lecture Thursday at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

 

-by Natasha Hemley

-image from Tojosan

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  • I too am a social worker; however, i am also realistic. Uptown, where i live, has MORE than its share of social services that draws in folks needing them. it is my understanding that uptown has the vast majority of social services in ALL of Cook cty!!! including services for sex offenders and paroles. providing and needing social services is fine and i support these services BUT how about NOT concentrating these services in one place? are social services needed in uptown because it's just a big coincidence that those in need of these social services just happen to live in uptown area OR are the services needed here beccause folks are already drawn here due to the disproportionate amount of social services that are offered here? how about some of the surrounding neighborhoods and suburbs offering some of these social services?

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