What's Up This Week: Chicago teachers strike, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac protest, and CHA public hearing

What's Up This Week: Chicago teachers strike, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac protest, and CHA public hearing

Here's some of the stories relating to race and poverty that's happening around Chicago this week:

Chicago Teacher Strike. Chicago teachers are on strike for the first time in 25 years. After the the two sides failed to reach an agreement by the strike deadline Sunday, officials began to prepare to have more than 350,000 students not in school.

A Demand to Clean Up. Housing activists will head to the regional headquarters of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Monday to demand that the housing agencies "clean house." Groups including the Chicago Anti-Eviction campaign and Centro Autónomo will brings buckets and brooms to "sweep out policies that have offered few solutions to the millions of underwater homeowners and left millions more homeless following foreclosure."

CHA Public Meeting. The Chicago Housing Authority will hold a public meeting Tuesday on the latest section of its transformation plan and its Moving to Work plan for fiscal year 2013. The policies in the plan for transformation have placed officials and public housing residents at odds for years.

Walmart Workers. A city council committee is going to vote on a resolution Tuesday in support of Organization United for Respect at Walmart, a workers group calling for better working conditions. The resolutions will also "call for Walmart to reevaluate current employee policies and benefits." Walmart is notorious for not allowing its workers to unionize, and this was one of the main disagreements that opponents of Walmart had about bringing the store to Chicago.

"Blow the Whistle" on Police Brutality: Chicago will be included in Thursday's national campaign to call out police brutality. The protest asks for "anybody, wherever we are" to go into the street and blow a whistle. The idea was originally targeting the "Stop and Frisk" policy of the New York Police Department, which have been accused of racial bias.

 

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  • It's good to see teachers standing up for themselves, too often their work goes unappreciated. I just wish that people would realize this is not all about the money for them. Teachers can only strike about salary disputes thus when they want to fight for other issues, salary must be on the bargaining table. Democracy Now had a great interview this morning with teachers, parents, and supporters about the real meaning of the strikes, check it out at http://democracynow.org

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