Archive for July 2012

Bill to admit domestic violence priors as evidence in murder cases awaits Quinn

As the murder trial against former Bolingbrook police officer Drew Peterson gets under way, his history of domestic violence is expected to play a key role. Peterson is accused of murdering his then-wife Kathleen Savio in 2004, and prosecutors are expected to use his previous record of abuse against Savio to try and convict him.... Read more »

My city meadow: the future of LeClaire Courts

My city meadow: the future of LeClaire Courts
I cut my teeth as a reporter at LeClaire Courts. It was the location of my first Chicago Housing Authority board meeting. My first complex-wide shouting match between residents and the CEO, and the first time I really got to know public housing residents and see the struggle they faced to save their community. It... Read more »

Undocumented Life: A birthday celebration for a Little Village church that mixes immigration activism and faith

Salvadorean Father Jose Landaverde who founded the Our Lady of Guadalupe Mission in Little Village, prepares to speak at the press conference which is celebrating its 5th anniversary helping the community fight injustices.
In the heart of Little Village, there’s a small, hardly noticeable, church. Since it opened five years ago, this congregation has become a well-known beacon of activism for the rights of undocumented immigrants. On any given day, there are several parishioners working on campaigns. There are families fighting deportation orders, workers trying to recover lost wages and... Read more »
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Barber Shop Show Review: What's behind the decline in black baseball players?

Barber Shop Show Review: What's behind the decline in black baseball players?
If you look at the current rosters for the Cubs and the Sox, you’ll only find one African American player, Orlando Hudson. And he’s been sitting on the bench. On Friday’s Barber Shop Show, we took a look at the presence of African American players in Major League Baseball. Our guests Evan Moore, Ben Strauss... Read more »

What's up this week: City to hold hearing on taxi-fare hike; state cuts prompt closure of famous South Side mental health clinic

What's up this week: City to hold hearing on taxi-fare hike; state cuts prompt closure of famous South Side mental health clinic
Chicago taxi drivers will be able to officially plead their case for a fare increase Tuesday when the city’s Committee on Transportation and Public Way holds a hearing to discuss the matter. Earlier this month, a new tiered lease rate went into effect, significantly increasing what some drivers pay to lease cabs. Some drivers cried... Read more »

Can we blame poverty and segregation for Chicago's skyhigh murder rate?

Can we blame poverty and segregation for Chicago's skyhigh murder rate?
All of us at The Chicago Reporter are big fans of the Chicago Reader’s Steve Bogira, and this week, Bogira’s got a great cover story and some shocking data on the relationship between poverty and Chicago’s homicide rate. As we reached 300 homicides this year so far, a milestone we met nearly two months earlier... Read more »
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Signed Into Law: more parking difficulties for disabled people; less landfills for Cook County

At the end of each session in Springfield, a pile of bills that pass the legislature end up on Gov. Pat Quinn’s desk awaiting his signature. We’ll keep track of those that make it into law. Disabled people will no longer get automatic parking meter fee exceptions – HB5624 will not only increase the fine... Read more »

New law bans some predatory lending practices that had hurt vulnerable communities

New law bans some predatory lending practices that had hurt vulnerable communities
The practice of giving high risk home loans to minorities and financially vulnerable communities is alive and well, says a legislator behind a bill that seeks to ban two types of tricky lending practices. SB1692, passed in May and signed by Gov. Pat Quinn on July 25th, would ban prepayment penalties and balloon payments. Written... Read more »

Race, poverty and politics: City passes new gun law, OKs $7M in police torture settlements; CTU, CPS agree on longer day with more teachers; Chick-fil-A not on Logan Square's menu

Chicago Inspector General Joseph Ferguson and 14th Ward Ald. Ed Burke are in a feud that went public Thursday over Burke’s refusal to release information on the city’s workers compensation program. Ferguson wants to look into reports of a number of police officers and firefighters abusing the city’s disability pay programs. Burke, as chair of... Read more »
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Study turns conventional wisdom about teen pregnancy and poverty on its head

Study turns conventional wisdom about teen pregnancy and poverty on its head
Conventional wisdom goes something like this: have a baby while you’re a teen, and you’re doomed to a life of poverty. Lower lifetime earnings, slim chance at higher education and a greater likelihood that your children will also have kids while they’re in their teens. But what if the conventional wisdom was backward? What if... Read more »