Archive for September 2010

Rahm departs White House. What you may (or may not) know about Chicago's possible mayoral candidate

Rahm departs White House. What you may (or may not) know about Chicago's possible mayoral candidate
It’s official. Rahm Emanuel is leaving the White House. The now former presidential chief of staff is still mum on whether he will officially run for mayor of Chicago. We take a look back at his career, voting record and personal history. For some more Rahm-related fun, follow his twitter doppelganger, @MayorEmanuel, play Vanity Fair’s... Read more »

Chicago's next female mayor

Madigan says she'll continue to serve as the state's Attorney General, but not as mayor.
Chicago’s first female mayor, Jane Byrne. The City of Chicago hasn’t had a female mayor since Jane Byrne was elected in 1979–the first and only woman to run Chicago. I was certain that when Mayor Richard M. Daley announced he wouldn’t seek an unprecedented 7th term, certainly plenty of women would join the fray of... Read more »

News Roundup: McDonald's considers health care insurance cuts for hourly workers

Nearly 30,000 McDonald’s wage workers may lose their insurance benefits if federal regulators do not agree to waive a provision of the new heath care legislation. The stipulation under question forces companies that offer “mini-med” insurance plans to spend at least 80 percent of premiums on medical costs. In a memo to federal regulators, the... Read more »
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Illinois extends jobs for 26,000, but thousands more Americans could get pink slips

For many Americans, today is a sad day. For 240,000 people, it might just be their last day on the job. Why?  They’re employed through the TANF emergency fund – a government subsidized jobs program that’s put 26,000 people to work in our state. Governor Pat Quinn announced Tuesday that he’ll use state funding to... Read more »

Since Obama's election, has racism gotten better or worse?

I will always remember being in Grant Park the night Barack Obama was elected president. The air was thick with a kind of intoxicating magic. People were crying, hugging strangers, singing and shouting. But two years later, I think it’s safe to say the bloom is off the rose. That night, America felt to me... Read more »

Is Chicago fudging crime stats?

Despite the daily reports of shooting deaths and violent crime in Chicago, we are constantly reassured by the Chicago Police Department of one thing: crime is down. Even though several people perceive crime to be higher, officials tell us to take comfort in the statistics that show that crime rates are falling. My police beat... Read more »
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Poverty could begin in utero

When people complain that poor people aren’t doing enough to help themselves, I remind them most poor folks are children. One in three kids in Chicago live in poverty, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau. We already know that kids who live in poverty are more likely to end up poor as... Read more »

News roundup: Chicago banks refinance their bailout for cheaper Fed program

The first four of Chicago’s small banks to pay back the federal government for the Troubled Asset Relief Program funds they received turned around and refinanced with a cheaper  federal bailout program, despite the fact that all but one were profitable during the first half of the year. The banks, including Hanover Park’s First Eagle... Read more »

Poor kids may be getting a better lunch, but less dinner

More fruits, vegetables and whole grains in school lunches – what could be wrong with that? Quite a bit if the U.S. House of Representatives passes a revamped school lunch bill. The legislation would give schools more money for lunches, but would do so by cutting funding for food stamps. That equation is raising the... Read more »
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News Roundup: Illinois about to get big bill

Illinois will soon have to pay the interest on the $2.2 billion borrowed from the federal government to replenish a depleted Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund. The $250 million interest payment is due in the next 15 months, and is just one in a backlog of unpaid state bills and pension obligations. While the borrowing has... Read more »