Readers' Symposium: What's Your Favorite Novel of 2012?

Readers! 2012 is drawing to a close and there have been many incredible books released this year. From Lauren Groff's epic masterpiece, "Arcadia" to the sumptuous and raw, "This Is How You Lose Her" by Junot Diaz and several others in between.

You probably already could have guessed what my favorite book of 2012 was: "Arcadia" by Lauren Groff. The novel had me in tears. Groff wrote such incredible, realistic characters in a stunning and original way that was completely beautiful and mesmerizing. Set in a hippy commune in the late 1960s, the story is told in vignettes in third-person from the perspective of Bit Stone. Readers get to follow Stone through out his life, from the dissolving of the commune due to the recklessness of "Handy" (the founder) to a post-apocalyptic near-future. I loved the book so much, not only did I weep when I finished it, but I also emailed Lauren Groff (who is a wonderful woman) to thank her for bringing this novel into existence. I hope you all have a chance to read it, it's really an incredible book.

Now that I've shared my favorite book of this year, I would love if you shared your favorite book of this year and why in a two or three sentences below. I would love to compile a list to post on the website on Monday.

 

Filed under: Uncategorized

Comments

Leave a comment
  • "Madness: The War of 1812, a Novel" by Dennis Byrne.

  • fb_avatar

    I've been speeding through Heroines by Kate Zambreno for the last few days, and though I haven't finished it yet, it's promising to be my favorite book of the year. It's part memoir and part biography of the modernist wives. I've been stopping every other page to read passages aloud to my roommate and scream, "Can you believe that? Can you believe Scott erased Zelda like that!?"

  • fb_avatar

    I'm going to go with one that's probably not on everyone's radar: Karolina Waclawiak's "How to Get Into the Twin Palms." Karolina's writing and storytelling is so raw and honest; her storytelling is fresh and modern. Like the blurbs say, yes it's a twist on the immigrant novel, but it's also so much more. It captures a need to belong that we see across cultures and generations and genders. Karolina has an unbelievable knack for stripping away the B.S. of relationships and zeroing in on the core of us as people, the core of how we interact in our relationships... what really makes us tick, the power plays, the actions both planned and unavoidable, the curiosity, the unknown, the expectations, the false hope. Here's the NYT review: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/21/books/review/how-to-get-into-the-twin-palms-by-karolina-waclawiak.html

Leave a comment