Three 9/11 September 11th Tributes / Memorials in Chicago

Three 9/11 September 11th Tributes / Memorials in Chicago
A piece of steel from the World Trade Center is one of the over 150 relics embedded in its outer walls.

In honor of the lives lost 17 years ago, I thought it would be interesting to post an article on where you can find tributes or memorials in Chicago.  It is hard to believe that if you are a high school senior you would not have any memory of that day.  I did find three locations in Chicago where you can find references to the tragedy.

Tribune Tower – 435 N. Michigan Avenue

A piece of metal from the World Trade Center

A piece of metal from the World Trade Center

The former home of the Chicago Tribune Newspaper was completed in 1925 as the result of an architectural contest started in 1922.  The architects are John Mead Howells and Raymond M. Hood.  It is modeled on the Butter Tower of Rouen Cathedral and the outer walls are adorned with relics of over 150 famous buildings or locations from around the world including the Great Wall of China and the Great Pyramid of Giza.  Included in the collection is a large piece of actual steel from the World Trade Center Towers.  While it is not a formal memorial it is a tribunal tribute of sorts.

 

Chicago Fire Academy – 558 De Koven Street

The Chicago Fire Academy sits on the site of the start of the Great Chicago Fire.

The Chicago Fire Academy sits on the site of the start of the Great Chicago Fire.

The current Chicago Fire Academy opened in 1961 and is on the site of the O’Leary Barn/House where the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 began.  Inside the building is a tribute to the to the 343 New York firefighters who lost their lives as a result of the attacks of September 11, 2001.  The memorial consists of a poster with a portrait of every New York City firefighter lost as well as metal castings of Fire Helmets.  The memorial entitled, “Heroes of 9/11, A Luminary Tribute” was dedicated on September 11, 2006.

A luminary tribute to the New York City firemen lost at the World Trade Center

A luminary tribute to the New York City firemen lost at the World Trade Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Livingston Field Park -  2139 W. Lexington Street

A stone memorial to the Little League coaches lost in the North Tower of the World Trade Center

A stone memorial to the Little League coaches lost in the North Tower of the World Trade Center

The Illinois Medical District agreed to lease and convert a vacant lot into a baseball field in the early 1990s after the Near North Little League lost their field.  In 2009 the site was transferred to the Chicago Park District.  The park is named after David O. Livingston who was a Korean War veteran and an executive director of the Illinois Medical District.

 

Listing of names of those coaches lost on September 11, 2001.

Listing of names of those coaches lost on September 11, 2001.

 

In the park, you can find a memorial headstone dedicated by the Near West Little League which honors the former Near West Little League coaches and sponsors who were working in and died in the North Tower of the World Trade Center.  The names on the stone include Andrew Anthony Abate, Vincent Paul Abate, W. David Bauer, Timothy J. Coughlin, George William Morell, Michael James Stewart, and Michael A. Uliano.  The inscription on the stone reads, “In final tribute to our former Little League coaches and sponsors working in the North Tower of the World Trade Center, New York City.  So do not get tired of doing what is good.  Do not get discouraged and give up, for we will reap a harvest of blessing at the appropriate time.  Galations 6:9”.

 

There are many 9/11 memorials around the world and there is a registry page to search for memorials by location or keyword.

 
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