Kombucha DIY

With the recall still firmly in affect many Kombucha enthusiasts are fending for themselves. If you are interested in making your own check out Kombucha Kamp for guidance. There are also many helpful brewing demos on You Tube. Getting the right recipe down may take some time. There are a lot of factors that go into making a great glass of kombucha; such as the type of tea, temperature of room it sits in and the purity of water used. The more hot and humid your surroundings, the quicker your tea will ferment. Also, if you find your tea is too sour you may want to add less sugar into the next batch.

ktea photo.jpg

Tools of the trade. Photo credit: http://veganmunch.com.

Finding tea, sugar, water and a glass container may be easy but you will also need a SCOBY and you can't pick up one up at the local convenient mart. A SCOBY is an acronym for Symbiotic Colony of Bacteria and Yeast. You can buy one on-line or see if a friend who brews kombucha can share one with you. I bought mine from the makers of Nessalla Kombucha at the Andersonville farmer's market for $10.00. They make some of the best kombucha, which they also sell there as well. The Andersonville farmer's market is open every Wednesday from 3-8:00 p.m. Renalli's also sells their kombucha blends as well as gluten-free pasta and pizza.

You can find the handiwork of local brewers Thrive and Nessalla at the Green Grocer. Thrive can also be found at LifeSpring Health Foods, Logan Square's Dill Pickle Co-Op and New Wave Coffee. Outside of Chicago (if you happen to be road tripping) you can find California-based Vibranz Kombucha Teas. Vibranz recently made a return to store shelves after reformulating its product line to meet FDA guidelines for alcohol content.

Comments

Leave a comment
  • Actually, if your tea is too sour, that means do not let it ferment so long next time! You can use "sour" kombucha for salad dressing, or to start a new batch of kombucha tea (kt). You can also mix it with "newer" (sweeter) kt to get a mix that you like...

    BTW, if you add less sugar to your next batch, you might find that the kombucha tastes "watery". But you are right that it is a balancing act. Good luck!

  • In reply to KomBuChaCha:

    Thanks for the great tips. I've done the salad dressing thing as well as used it as a hair rinse.

Leave a comment

  • ChicagoNow is full of win

    Welcome to ChicagoNow.

    Meet our bloggers,
    post comments, or
    pitch your blog idea.

  • Advertisement:
  • Meet The Blogger

    PatriciaBiesen

    Patricia Biesen is a Holistic Health Coach specializing in helping "eclectic eaters" find delicious alternatives. Eclectic eaters are those with food allergies, diabetics, sugaraholics, vegans or anyone on a specialty diet. She is also a passionate campaigner for positive body image. She has also guest blogged for Kris Carr's Crazy Sexy Cancer, Blog World Expo, Living Harvest Tempt and many more.

  • Latest on ChicagoNow

  • Advertisement:
  • Fresh Chicago News